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What's It All About?  Tai Chi

What's It All About?  Tai Chi

David Silver, Ramel Rones, May 25, 2015

Each day, millions of men and women worldwide practice the Chinese martial art Tai Chi Chuan (taijiquan), which has been known for centuries to promote deep relaxation, excellent health, and to prevent injuries and illness. This gentle moving meditation teaches you to find balance between strength and flexibility, increases bone density, while involving all of the various soft tissues in your body: muscles, tendons, ligaments, fasciae, and skin. More >>

Moving Taiji Qigong

Moving Taiji Qigong

Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming, May 15, 2015

Moving taiji qigong includes both stationary and walking exercises. The following discusses the first of three stationary sets with exercises. The first one, which I call the “primary set,” is generally used for taijiquan beginners. I call the second set the “coiling set,” since it emphasizes coiling movements. The third set is the “rocking set.” More >>

One World, One Breath: An Interview with Bill Douglas, founder of World Tai Chi Day & Qigong Day

One World, One Breath: An Interview with Bill Douglas, founder of World Tai Chi Day & Qigong Day—Part 2

Barbara Langley, David Silver, April 20, 2015

I recently spoke to Bill Douglas, founder of World Tai Chi and Qigong Day, about his experience with this amazing global event.  Here is Part 2 of the interview.  See April 13, 2015 for Part 1. More >>

One World, One Breath: An Interview with Bill Douglas, founder of World Tai Chi Day & Qigong Day—Part 1

Barbara Langley, David Silver, April 13, 2015

World Tai Chi & Qigong Day (WTCQD) will be celebrated on April 25, 2015 at 10 a.m. in every time zone around the world. You can participate in this global day of peace by yourself or with your local tai chi group by simply practicing at 10 a.m. As the day passes, a wave of energy will encircle the globe through the hearts and minds of practitioners on every continent. More >>

Power Training for Tai Chi Sword

Power Training for Tai Chi Sword

Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming, April 6, 2015

According to Chinese martial Qigong, the power is first generated from the mind. From the mind, the Qi is led to the physical body to manifest it as power. Therefore, we can see that the Qi is the energy, while the physical body is like the machine. A detailed explanation of Qigong can be found in the YMAA book The Essence of Shaolin White Crane. More >>

About Pushing Hands—Part 2

About Pushing Hands—Part 2

Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming, March 30, 2015

An (Press or Push Down) means to settle the wrist. It is executed by using the base of the palm, either one palm or both palms can press and push. An can be divided into offensive An and defensive An. In offensive An, the base of the palm is used to push upward to the chin to destroy the opponent's central equilibrium; to the throat to seal the opponent's breath; to push forward to Xinkan (Jiuwei) (i.e., solar plexus area) to seal the breath as well as destroy the opponent's central equilibrium or shock his heart; to push downward to the abdominal area to destroy the stability of the lower part of his body or to seal his breath. More >>

About Pushing Hands—Part 1

About Pushing Hands—Part 1

Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming, March 23, 2015

Practicing Methods of the Four Directions and Four Corners (Eight Doors, Eight Trigrams). What are the four directions and four corners? They are the eight doors. It is also the theory of Eight Trigrams in Taijiquan. What are the four directions? More >>

Basic Taiji Theory

Basic Taiji Theory

Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming, March 16, 2015

If we desire to understand taiji theory, then we must first trace back to its origins and roots. Only then will we know how and where it came from. Although a great proportion of Chinese martial arts history is vague, we can still trace it with some accuracy and in some detail. More >>

Marshal Yue, Fei's Ten Important Theses—Part 6, Final

Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming, Liang, Shou-Yu, March 9, 2015

Grab the right, enter the left. Grab the left, enter the right. When stepping forward, the heels touch the ground first. The tip of the foot uses the toes to grab the ground. The stepping must be steady and the body must be solemn. The strike must be firm, solid, and have Li from the bones. While going (i.e., attacking), the hands are relaxed and when they reach the opponent they become fists. When fists are used, curl (the fingers) in tightly. More >>

Marshal Yue, Fei's Ten Important Theses—Part 5

Marshal Yue, Fei's Ten Important Theses—Part 5

Liang, Shou-Yu, Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming, February 23, 2015

It is the stepping, which gives your strategy life and creates the hundreds of variations. It is also the stepping, which allows you to react naturally to an attack and avoid or escape from dangerous situations. More >>

Videos and Podcasts...


Episode 1

Episode 1.
Chinese Martial Arts Definitions

Episode 2

Episode 2.
Retreat Center Interview PART 1

Episode 3

Episode 3.
Retreat Center Interview PART 2

Episode 4

Episode 4.
Northern and Southern Chinese Styles


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