Taijiquan theory in practice (in nature)

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Taijiquan theory in practice (in nature)

Postby Josh Young » Tue Jun 05, 2012 5:32 pm

We have all heard about the idea of repelling 1000lbs of force with a few ounces, now there is a good example of this type of thing occurring in nature.

The example is that of the lowly mosquito and the mighty raindrop.

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/st ... 33970.html

In a new study, Dr. Hu and his team of researchers studied how mosquitoes survive the impact of raindrops that are more than 50 times their body mass.
...
At first, researchers tried to determine how mosquitoes managed to avoid the countless raindrops that fall in any given storm. Instead, they discovered that the mosquitoes don't avoid the rain at all. When a drop lands on a mosquito, the insect literally rides the wave of moisture, with his powerful exoskeleton making the impact no more powerful than the equivalent of a human brushing their own arm with a feather. The water then glides off the mosquito's body, allowing it to continue its flight unencumbered.


Imagine that you weight a mere 100lbs and are hit by a moving body that weighs 5000lbs... and you simply ride that force like a wave, neutralizing the ability of that force to destroy you and not absorbing any of it, this is what mosquitoes are doing.

Another thing to consider is this: the water drops are not moving slowly.

"Drops are coming down 10 times faster than mosquitoes can fly," Hu said.


This ability is due to the insubstantial manner of the mosquito, their softness allowing them to overcome the force. When they are unable to respond in this manner the result is very different:

However, if the mosquito is resting on a tree branch or flying close to the ground, the results can be much more deadly. That same feather-like impact could instead impact with as much force as 10,000 times the insect's body weight.


Essentially when the mosquito does not yield, it is destroyed.

Many who practice taijiquan are aware of these principals, now there is yet another excellent example of these principals in action.
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Re: Taijiquan theory in practice (in nature)

Postby Josh Young » Tue Jun 05, 2012 5:45 pm

http://news.yahoo.com/video#video=29563554

In the video the mosquito uses a very taiji like motion, with both a peng like connection and a rollback like motion. The mosquito does this without trying, without training.

In taiji we use this same type of interaction to negate force. I love this example.
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Re: Taijiquan theory in practice (in nature)

Postby brer_momonga » Tue Jun 05, 2012 6:22 pm

Josh Young wrote:http://news.yahoo.com/video#video=29563554

In the video the mosquito uses a very taiji like motion, with both a peng like connection and a rollback like motion. The mosquito does this without trying, without training.

In taiji we use this same type of interaction to negate force. I love this example.


so it was a mosquito practicing his taijiquan who caused the water sprinklers to ruin Shalita Harris' wedding? :lol:
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Re: Taijiquan theory in practice (in nature)

Postby Sanfung » Thu Jun 07, 2012 1:00 am

This story actually reminded me of the historical explanation behind Taijiquan theory. In the 14th century, a Taoist scholar named Chang San Fung or some permutation thereof watched a fight between a snake and a bird. The circular, fluid movements of the snake eluded the crane. Soft motions based around force as opposed to brute strength were able to overcome the aggressive crane. In fact, some versions of the story I've heard suggest that he grew tired and had to leave without seeing the outcome of the fight because the snake continuously eluded the crane. The bird was never able to get anywhere. Thus, the principles of Taijiquan were designed around observations from this example in nature.

The idea with the mosquito seems to be very similar in theory.
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Re: Taijiquan theory in practice (in nature)

Postby John the Monkey mind » Thu Jun 07, 2012 9:07 am

I was sitting in my car yesterday and saw a hawk get mobbed by a flock of smaller birds.
Wherever the hawk would turn the smaller birds would follow its movement. Yielding to its on rush and following its retreats only to peck at its rear. It was like watching pushing hands or sticking hands with the continual fluid manoeuvring of the animals, up and down left and right forward and then turn back.

The strategy employed by the smaller birds was interesting as they seemed to keep one bird just out ahead of the hawk wile another stuck to its rear. By maintaining a partial envelopment of the hawk they could harry it in safety.
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