Zhan Zhuang training

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Zhan Zhuang training

Postby feck » Sun Feb 19, 2006 4:24 pm

Just wanted some general views on this type of training, and anyones experiances with this. How it has effected other types of training?, effectivness in generating jing?.
Do people still follow the route of using this type of training for at least a year before attempting any other forms, Qigong, Brocade, Bagua, Taiji or others.

Does Dr Yang reccomend this type of training?
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Postby abersold » Mon Feb 20, 2006 8:20 am

Hi feck,

Everyone is different related to this; Over many years I found that some like doing movement first and then practicing stillness; and some like the process vice versa. If you have a hard time meditating the first option would be better and if not.. going to the core of the practice is what you can do.

I have studied this with every master that I have done Martial Arts and Self healing with over the last 24 years. I recommend you investigate Sifu Fong Ha, whos practice and approach to be the deepest and most accessible for anyone. Website is Http://fongha.com

Eight Simple exercise to Health (Eight Brocades) is a great movement supplement for you if a beginner, Tai Chi Qigong, Tai Chi Ball 1 & 2 are all very accesible and easy to learn. Sunrise Tai Chi DVD is a excellent approach to a movement form & it is super duper packed with years of training wisdom extra's. I recommend sunrise for a direct Tai Chi movement form that doesn't take long to learn form wise.

Sifu Fong sells a workshop dvd that covers many stillness and movement practices that relate to his lineage (Dong ying Jie, Han Xing Yuen, Cai Songfeng). A class in community program is the best for this practice as it will help you stick to it and is more enjoyable with a nice circle group.

Many success stories from health wise Wuji practice or Zhan Zhuang. I know someone that self balanced from years of heart problems within of 20 hours of self practice..another one overcame a addiction...another one helped balance from breast cancer..Rami Rones and his student Bob, he had extremley life threatening Cancer..go to this link
http://ramelrones.com/cancerwarrior.htm and view full article. The list goes on & on and is for real i have seen all the above expierence personally. Stillness standing is a great direct practice to harmonize and balance your body. The big leap is going deeply in and learning how to truly "do nothing" to "Achieve everything". Ken Cohen states ita s the "Million Dollar secret", not a secret anymore.

It takes time, go slowly I also recommend music in the beginning, it will help with the chaos of silence if that is an issue go to Ymaa store and check out Martial art music section "Zhan Zhuang Gong" is the best and is developed for the practice. Musical Qigong & practice will give you a double whammy effect for self healing and to disappear into your own Wu Chi ("Great Unkown"). hope this helps....
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Postby BaguaMonk » Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:10 am

Zhan Zhuang is priceless, every system has their own. I would reccommend the Zhang Zhuang methods found in Xingyi and Bagua systems.

One of the best, and most simple (yet very powerful) ones, is the tree hugging position (as I call it :) ). You can do it in a horse stance, or knees slightly belt, with the right posture of course (tounge on roof of mouth, straight back, wuyin tucked in etc.).Arm pits hollow, arms round, shoulders relaxed.

Another good one, is San Ti Shi, the basic Xingyi stance, make sure your alignments are correct, and stare into the space in between index and middle finger, imagine your mind expanding in front of it, but never concentrate on one thing.

Another basic one we do in bagua, is in horse stance, hold your arms out horizontally, as straight as possible. Stretch out your arms as far as possible, and hold it here. Imgine your bones, tendons, and marrow seperating while remaining calm and relaxed.

It will imrpove everything, pushing hands, jing, and posture.
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Postby Dvivid » Fri Sep 05, 2008 7:59 am

In my own practice, I've found Embrace the Tree to be such an excellent exercise. In my classes, that is the posture that best resonates with people and which usually leads them to their first physical sensations of their Qi.

Zhang Zhuang has almost everything you need in it! Alignment, balance, strength training, breathing, 4 or 5 gates qigong, weight resistance, quieting the mind, turning your attention inward, building stronger mind/body connection, and it trains your patience, endurance, perseverance, willpower and humility.

Love it!
"Avoid Prejudice, Be Objective in Your Judgement, Be Scientific, Be Logical and Make Sense, Do Not Ignore Prior Experience." - Dr. Yang

http://www.ymaa.com/publishing
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Zhang Zhuang training

Postby stillriver » Wed Sep 16, 2009 9:53 am

I first became aware of Zhang Zhuang during a late night TV session, when living in london. Strangely a show was on called "stand still, be fit". I tried the exercises and was really surprised with the results.... over the years I moved away from this practice but found myself continually drawn back to it.

When touring Thailand I began to practice again and during the first session, beads of sweat appeared on the centre of the palm in my right hand, a very interesting experience.

Since returning to a full time practice of TaiChi and Xing yi, this method has become one of my core or root forms. Outside is best, but not on a windy day. The form in itself is not really still as the energy of the mind becomes very apparent in this exercise. My mental monkey, resists then relaxes resists then yields, eventually the mind relaxes too, combined with alignment the benefits can be directly applied to neijia.

I found this website to be really useful for finding teachers who have incorperated Zhang Zhuang into their classes, enjoy your practice! http://www.taichicentral.com/
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Postby Dvivid » Wed Oct 07, 2009 7:56 am

I am recently using the Moving version of Zhan Zhuang, as taught by Zhou, Xuan Yun in his Wudang Taijiquan DVD
http://www.ymaa.com/publishing/internal ... _taijiquan

and it is so excellent. Almost without fail, it leads total newbies to feel their Qi in the first class. (When practiced after 3 or 4 other torso/arms qigong)

I highly recommend it for general health.
"Avoid Prejudice, Be Objective in Your Judgement, Be Scientific, Be Logical and Make Sense, Do Not Ignore Prior Experience." - Dr. Yang

http://www.ymaa.com/publishing
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Postby dmattwads » Mon Oct 12, 2009 4:28 pm

How long are you supposed to hold the pose for? At least for someone beginning?
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Postby Zhou He » Fri Nov 20, 2009 11:19 am

if you wanna feel the qi, you wanna hold until you feel uncomfortable -> that kinda helps you recognize the qi movement and stuffs

but for better training, stop when you feel like stopping. Personally, i like to count my breath. Breath in and out I count as 1, i do zhang zhuan for 108 breath then continue with gongfu practice or continue for a little bit more if i don't do gongfu after ward.
Then cool down, shake naturally.


You as beginners should stop at 32, move up one everyday ?
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Postby joeblast » Mon Nov 30, 2009 3:22 pm

ZZ is excellent for a bad back, too :)
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