What can I expect in training in a YMAA kung fu school?

Discuss shaolin longfist, white crane or other styles. Theory, practice and applications. Please stay on topic.

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What can I expect in training in a YMAA kung fu school?

Postby TheDuke » Fri Aug 06, 2010 3:36 pm

I was considering cross training in a YMAA Kung fu school and was curious on what I can expect? I guess the root of my question is how practical is the curriculum. As an outsider I'm leary on on how much of the training is just learning poses (which I know have their merits) vs learning practical self defense techniques. From reading up on Dr. Yang he does seem to be a very insightful and intelligent man, so I assume he definitely puts together something that will benefit the individual.
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Postby John the Monkey mind » Mon Aug 09, 2010 1:32 pm

Wile the YMAA school I attend has only got Taiji on the curriculum I think I can shed some light on this.


You will have to first study how to move correctly and in the correct stances, this will be coupled with striking and blocks and it is my guess that at this point you will start to be made aware of the application, once you have got the basics you will no doubt proceed to drills and sets. Only once you have got good form and built good reactions through drilling would it be practical to teach fighting.

The YMAA curriculum is all intended for practical use as far as I can see but you cant run before you can walk so you will have to get the basics before they can teach you anything useful, not because its secret or for higher students only but because it wont work otherwise. I have only done a year of the Taiji and I am guessing it is quicker for the Shaolin but I have only been shown applications so far not practised them, however more advanced students do and look very effective. My point is to get the most from Dr Yangs curriculum you have to follow it, his schools teach very effective martial arts but traditional arts are not mastered over night and take a wile to get in to. I did see Shaolin instructors sparing and they can really use what they know, its not just some dance and the YMAA seems very good at replicating this in people that stick with them.

You should go along and take a look, and ask the instructor, all the instructors I have met are helpful and are dedicated to their art.

They will no doubt train you hard as some traditional techniques are very physicality demanding and you have to be conditioned before you do them.
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Postby TheDuke » Mon Aug 09, 2010 7:12 pm

Thank you so much for your input. That helps. Think I will definitely give it a go.
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Postby Inga » Mon Aug 09, 2010 9:34 pm

If you are in the Southern NH, Eastern MA area, you have the pick of three schools:

http://www.ymaaboston.com/ (Jamaica Plain)

http://www.baystatefightingarts.com/ (Amesbury)

http://www.yangsandover.com/ (Andover)

Check out the sites and come and visit us !
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Postby TheDuke » Thu Aug 12, 2010 9:17 pm

Thanks again. From what I've been reading, it seems anything Master Yang is apart is effective.
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Postby oldstudent » Fri Aug 13, 2010 9:10 pm

I do not know exactly what you mean when you say "cross training". There are many schools and styles of martial arts and I am not saying one is better than another. If I could use one word to describe the "essence" of YMAA it would be DEPTH. Whether the student decides to study external style (white crane / long fist) or internal style (Tai Chi / Qigong) or both, the goal is personal development of understanding the martial art and its applications which only comes through years of dedication and practice under a teachers guidance.

When one thinks of the traditional martial arts one thinks of learning effective techniques to be used against an opponent in self defense. Of course this is a big part of YMAA Kung Fu, however YMAA is much more than that!

Master Yang believes that you are your own worst enemy. If you cheat, you only cheat yourself! The ultimate goal is to master yourself through martial arts. Old Student.
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I am new to this forum

Postby taichijourney » Sat Aug 21, 2010 11:43 pm

Hi

I am new here, but not to studying different styles. I am just getting acquainted with the YMAA organization, but it appears to me that they are trying to maintain good standards in martial arts training and spirit... You can never go wrong with that.

I am 57 and started studying the martial arts when I was 14. I have studied Judo, Kajukenbo and Shorin Yu Karate, Sil Lum (Shaolin) Kung Fu and now am starting to settle in to Tai Chi and Qi Gong (I don't heal as fast as I used too!).

I have, in my mind experienced the worst and the best in the martial arts over the years and have these two thoughts to convey:

I agree with Old Student ...

1. You WILL know a good Sensei or Sifu when you meet him or her. The self assured aire of a true master is unmistakable. They have nothing to prove and will teach through action.

2. A good teacher will teach you what you need to know. If that's form - and usually is when beginning a style, then do it. It that's technique then do it, if it's application... you get the idea...

My Sil Lum Sifu was the ONLY Caucasian taught by Professor TY Wong - immigrated here from China in 1935 in San Francisco and from what I recall, there was communication in action. Not a lot of talk.

Sounds like you are on the right track...

Go, watch, listen, talk little and study hard... Good luck
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Postby TheDuke » Wed Aug 25, 2010 2:26 pm

Thank you all for your responses.
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Postby rudybro » Wed Jul 13, 2011 2:59 am

I really want to go in training in kung fu. It's good for self defense.
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Postby Inga » Wed Jul 13, 2011 7:40 am

Hi Rudybro

If you look at the top menu bar of the YMAA page you'll see the heading "SCHOOLS". If you follow that you can see if there is a YMAA school near you.

: )
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Postby rudybro » Sat Jul 16, 2011 8:57 pm

aw :cry: I did'nt notice that one
but Thanks :lol:

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