Bruce Lee sparring video clip

Discuss sparring, training applications in a competition environment, or even in real-life (fighting, self-defence). Please no violence!
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Postby Tandem Car Park » Tue Jun 07, 2005 10:29 am

Walter Wong wrote:If you can keep distance, it becomes very difficult for your opponent to close in to hit or grab you. If you can't keep distance then it'll appear like the Muay Thai, MMA and the like bouts.


Why do you think Bruce Lee then gravitated to boxing-like footwork similar to what is seen in kickboxing and MMA matches?
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Postby zipwolf » Sun Jun 12, 2005 9:39 am

Tandem Car Park wrote:Why do you think Bruce Lee then gravitated to boxing-like footwork similar to what is seen in kickboxing and MMA matches?


I'd personaly speculate that its his own personal preference. Because one person gets on with one particular method, does not make it the best in the universe.
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Postby NorthernShaolin » Tue Jun 14, 2005 1:23 pm

BaguaMonk wrote:Perhaps, there was another article that also contested the Bruce Lee supposed-winner-outcome. ... I wonder if Chen (The Taiji teacher) will ever talk in full about it.


Well one really has to understand that these two sifus, Wong and Chen, are not your everyday martial artist and that they have risen above all the garbage concerning who won and who lost. Today, neither of them have nothing to gain to come out with their version. And they also have much respect to Bruce too. They well understand what the media has done concerning this match and are aware of the monies generated for those involved. Unfortunately they have no control over this.

I know both of these sifus very well and they said that there was no triad involvement nor was there any race card thrown out against Bruce.

Sifu Wong granted that at least one article of his version to be written because he believes people should be given an opportunity to read at least both sides. Sifu Chen and others in the article agreed to just one article.

Now if everything written concerning this match was thrown out the window, many Sifus of the older generation, which includes Wong Sifu and Chen Sifu, will tell you that if one examines and truely understands the Traditional Chinese Culture and the Traditional Chinese Martial Ethics and the thinking behind it, then the answer is very clear for everyone to see what really happen in the match. Hence, nothing needs to be written
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Postby No.6 » Tue Jun 21, 2005 4:19 pm

BaguaMonk wrote:He unconvered kung fu's greatest secrets, by himself, without a guiding hand, that is what I find the most impressive.


I think that if he could, Yip Man might have a word or two to say about 'without a guiding hand.'
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Postby BaguaMonk » Sun Nov 20, 2005 7:01 am

Now that I think about it, I don't know why I said "without a guiding hand," because that is exactly what teachers are there for. I guess what I meant was that without training for hours on end in standing zhan zhuang postures, chi gong routines, or tireless senseless fighting, he seems to have gotten there, through his own path, and without 40 years of Wing Chung training. Mentally/spritiually he was naturally able to get there, but maybe (philosophically speaking) that was his purpose in life. And I've realized, that for people to reach their maximum potential, it is necessary for people to follow their own path, without restriction from structure (wether martial art or religion, whatever it is that may hold you back) to get there. Oh well thats my 2 cents.

Who won doesn't really matter I guess. They all seem like respectable people to me.
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Postby Blarg » Tue Jan 24, 2006 2:47 pm

Tandem Car Park wrote:
Walter Wong wrote:If you can keep distance, it becomes very difficult for your opponent to close in to hit or grab you. If you can't keep distance then it'll appear like the Muay Thai, MMA and the like bouts.


Why do you think Bruce Lee then gravitated to boxing-like footwork similar to what is seen in kickboxing and MMA matches?


One reason is that when he came to the U.S., he was towered over by teenagers. His first students were just the guys he hung around with, and they were large bodied street fighters. Bruce at 5'6" and 130-ish pounds was a gorilla in Hong Kong, but a twerp in America.

Bruce realized he had to end a fight instantly, because he would have no chance of winning if he engaged in trading blows with people who outweighed him by 80 or 100 pounds; he didn't have the frame to absorb it. And if he got dragged down to the ground, it was lights out.

The Wong Jack Man fight further reinforced in his mind that he needed to be able to end a fight very quickly, not have it drag out into a long affair. If taking the punch of a skilled 200 pounder was possible for a few seconds on a frame like his, it wouldn't be easy and would require superb conditioning. But taking several minutes worth of them was out of the question.

So Bruce studied films of Ali and other boxers and started opening up his footwork. He also turned perhaps the primary emphasis of his own personal fighting style to a lightning fast close and strike with the leading limb, taking a page from the fencing lunge in this regard. Bruce practiced quick closes from distance endlessly. Jesse Glover and other key students have noted that his ability to cover ground quickly was amazing even from a good distance, and Jesse says the quick close, straight punch, and backfist were his favored techniques.

So elusive and aggressive footwork were survival skills for a small man in a land of giants. It was also key to inducing and taking advantage of mistakes in rhythm and timing, which was a great help in intercepting attacks, which also became a big part of Lee's personal style.
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www.bruceleefoundation.com

Postby thecrowrains » Wed Jan 25, 2006 5:55 pm

If ever you've seen that website: good things are coming for those interested in Jun Fan JKD.

A legal battle has essentially (finally) patented and copyrighted the rights to that name: Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do. Thirty years of incorrect teaching may just be gradually reversed. (hopefully). Lee's family has started the website: www.bruceleefoundation.com

Master Ted Wong and Teri Tom worked on a new book, jointly, but authored by T. Tom. It's available through Amazon.com or Tuttle publishing. This book also aims to espouse the teachings formed at the Bruce Lee Foundation.

GREAT video clip of the master himself! glad to have seen it! Many who've had the honor of sparring with Bruce Lee have stated his SHEER power was unstoppable in one punch!
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Postby Blarg » Thu Jan 26, 2006 5:20 am

I studied under Jim Demile's head student in the 70's, who showed me the 1 and 3-inch punches Demile passed down to him quite a few times. The power was literally so great it was cartoonish and people got up from the ground absolutely bewildered and unbelieving. And this without notable effort on my sifu's part, just a little flick, not even perceptible body movement. If the student is any comment on the teacher, Lee must have had the frightening power his much larger students regularly spoke of.
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Postby thecrowrains » Thu Jan 26, 2006 1:42 pm

Interesting food for thought: Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do, as Bruce Lee intended the art to be, surely was a departure from the Wing Chun philosophy [ to an extent ].

Nadi, Haslet, among others, were the boxing and western-fencing scholars and practitioners that he delved into for philosophical and technical research.

It has been said that Lee's extensive research freed him from ''chasing'' the opponents' hands, aka: Wing Chun's sticky hands. And going straight for the target: the opponent's head, etc.

just food for thought. peace
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Postby BaguaMonk » Sun Jan 29, 2006 12:35 am

Inch power, gotta love it :)

It is no different than short jing, or fa jing. The worst part is, is when my teacher breaks my structure and uses this sort of jing from his shoulder from point blank to send me flying (literally), mostly because I'm off balance, but it also hurts since it is also a strike. But as I always say, the best type of fa jing is not the kinds that send you flying, but drop you on the spot :)
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Postby Blarg » Sat Feb 04, 2006 12:29 am

Yeah. That's not ideal for demonstrations, of course. Sending a student flying beats making his liver explode or making him suddenly drop dead on the spot. I think I'd rather just fly. :)
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Postby BaguaMonk » Mon Feb 06, 2006 3:41 pm

Heh, most teachers don't explode livers or cause internal injuries because they can't. They're skills don't go any farther than form and push hands, and that sucks :( Real teachers who had ability to cause internal injuries could show it to you simply by causing an ache, or an imbalance in certain parts of the body without it being lethal or (like Wang Shu Jin) too painful. But I guess in the US, most teachers are here to make money, so they don't practice those skills. And its also a liability, oh well.

Its also a very hard and advandced method of striking/skill anyways, there aren'ty many IMA teachers who have this ability, and able to use to willingly in sparring and fighting, without having to prepare and sit there for 30 seconds before they are ready.
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two opponents in video-clip??

Postby thecrowrains » Mon Feb 13, 2006 2:24 pm

Can anyone discern if Bruce Lee if fighting two opponents in that clip??

In the clip, it appears as though the first opponent is knocked down rather handily by Lee, but there seems to be a SECOND fighter vs. Bruce that seems to evade him for the most part (?), equating a draw or tie?

hard to say?
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Postby Dvivid » Wed Mar 22, 2006 10:11 am

"Avoid Prejudice, Be Objective in Your Judgement, Be Scientific, Be Logical and Make Sense, Do Not Ignore Prior Experience." - Dr. Yang

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Fist of Fury

Postby tim 1 mc » Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:34 am

Hello I'am new to this forum know thou this to remember to humble the fist can be found written in the book of the major prophet Isaiah in chapter 58:4 under the new heading Fist of Wickedness.
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Postby ironrogue » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:07 pm

So here is a question for all of you. How do you know bruce lee was really that great? We know he had some street fights when he was younger. He demoed his fighting ability once in ed parkers tournament(does anyone know who his opponent was)? He also had a fight with Wong Jack Man that he may have one or may have lost. How good was the guy he sparred, not fought? Honestly, there really isn't that much evidence of his ability. Many guys look good in movies. Many guys look good doing demos. William Chen looks really good doing demos and we all know about that. That same story is out there with tons of guys.
pain is weakness leaving the body
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Postby Dvivid » Thu Jun 19, 2008 7:55 am

Bruce Lee was great if only for the reason that he may be the reason we are all here discussing Chinese Martial Arts. He introduced most of us to the arts. He has a 'coolness' factor that outweighs the arguments if he was the most skillful martial artist or not. He was the among the first to open the arts to the West, a legend.

Who would win, your sifu or Bruce?
"Avoid Prejudice, Be Objective in Your Judgement, Be Scientific, Be Logical and Make Sense, Do Not Ignore Prior Experience." - Dr. Yang

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Postby sysop » Thu Jun 19, 2008 12:49 pm

ironrogue wrote:So here is a question for all of you. How do you know bruce lee was really that great?


The One (1) Inch Punch! :wink:

Image {Link Broken}

At the invitation of Ed Parker, Lee appeared in the 1964 Long Beach International Karate Championships and performed repetitions of two-finger pushups (using the thumb and the index finger) with feet at approximately a shoulder-width apart. In the same Long Beach event he also performed the "One inch punch". The description of which is as follows: Lee stood upright, his right foot forward with knees bent slightly, in front of a standing, stationary partner. Lee's right arm was partly extended and his right fist approximately an inch away from the partner's chest. Without retracting his right arm, Lee then forcibly delivered the punch to his partner while largely maintaining his posture, sending the partner backwards and falling into a chair said to be placed behind the partner to prevent injury, though the force of gravity caused his partner to soon after fall onto the floor.

His volunteer was Bob Baker of Stockton, California. "I told Bruce not to do this type of demonstration again", he recalled. "When he punched me that last time, I had to stay home from work because the pain in my chest was unbearable." - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Lee


The One inch punch is a skill which uses fa jing (translated as explosive power) to generate tremendous (although unmeasured) amounts of impact force at extremely close distances. When performing this one inch punch the practitioner stands with his fist very close to the target (the distance depends on the skill of the practitioner, usually from 0-6 inches). Then in one explosive burst, the legs root, the waist turns, the ribs expand and the arm extends through the target. It is crucial that the entire body move in unison, or else the power will be limited.
Last edited by sysop on Tue Jan 20, 2009 8:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby lilman » Fri Jun 20, 2008 2:13 am

Just thought Id throw in my 2 cents.

In Bruce Lee's book The Tao of Jeet Kune Do, he describes a punch as guided by the waist, completely relaxed, until the moment of impact, then tighten the fist, and the punch should end 1 inch behind the target. Sounds to me a lot like what Dr. Yang describes as soft/hard Jing. Thats the secret behind Bruce Lee's power. Anyone can learn that. He never goes into Qi in his book though, so who knows...
Also he quotes the I ching a lot. He makes a lot of references to water, and just kinda changes the words around. Meaning, his theory is similar to that of bagua and Taiji. So he changed depending on the opponents attack. Which is why you see him testing his opponents a lot, so he provokes them to attack or defend, before he attacks or defends.
So pretty much he just combines techniques, soft/hard Jing, and the I Ching to become a famous martial artist.
Theres Jeet Kune Do in a nutshell. Anyone who studies any Traditional martial arts could do the same. So though I respect Bruce Lee, there is always a higher mountain, any man can be beaten. Does it matter if he ever got beaten, no. Either way his admirers will be his admirers, his enemies will be his enemies.

My 2 cents. :)
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