Side Cut Kick

Discuss shaolin longfist, white crane or other styles. Theory, practice and applications. Please stay on topic.

Moderators: Dvivid, Inga, nyang

Side Cut Kick

Postby Psycrow » Tue Sep 20, 2005 5:17 pm

Hey guys,

I've been told by the more logically minded students in our club that its "useless in a fight" is this true? I can see how it may take time to build power in the kick but I can also see how certain targets could be hit very well.

Just wondering what you guys think. I've only been training the 1st stripe curriculum (spelling!) for a short time but when shown this kick i fell in love with it!
"You point; I punch"
Psycrow
Forum User
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 10:34 am

Postby darth_freak » Wed Sep 21, 2005 5:25 am

a lot of kicks may seem useless; however it may be good to know how to do them, they could be used. Where you can kick with the heel you can kick with the side cut...so if you get the side of the knee...a side cut might be good in there.
I like that kick but my ankles and hips are not flexible enough so that I can do a good one :(
"Turn your butt!"
Master Yang.

Xavier
darth_freak
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 572
Joined: Mon Nov 10, 2003 5:42 pm
Location: Paris, France

Postby Walter Wong » Wed Sep 21, 2005 8:03 am

You need to practice the kicks on a punching bag. Learn how to get the power out. Make the punching bag fold in half from the impact of your kick. At that point, I say you'll do some damage to your opponent with that kick. Also if your leg is properly aligned with your hips and body, then it'll seem effortless to execute power. Kick the bag alot and find how to do damage with your kick.

Same practice should be done with punches and hand strikes. Hit/kick the bag as frequently as you can.
Shaolin and Liu He Ba Fa instructor of Boston YMAA Headquarters
Walter Wong
Forum God
 
Posts: 1091
Joined: Thu Nov 20, 2003 11:22 am
Location: Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

Postby citrus538 » Wed Sep 21, 2005 11:30 pm

Hitting solid objects to hit is very important. Having other people trying to hit you is also very important : )

The first time I ever took techniques out of a form and practiced them against a bag. . .well let's just say it wasn't pretty. And if we aren't able to use any techniques in the forms, what good are they? Lian bu quan has been very kind to me in friendly inter-style sparring matches : )
citrus538
Forum Addict
 
Posts: 59
Joined: Thu Mar 18, 2004 2:48 pm

Postby Psycrow » Thu Sep 22, 2005 6:22 am

Thanks for the replys guys,

I think a punching bag might be a good investment!
"You point; I punch"
Psycrow
Forum User
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 10:34 am

Postby yat_chum » Thu Sep 22, 2005 10:07 am

My old Wing Chun Sifu didn’t like the side cut kick, he used to spar a lot with guys who trained in Kuk Sool Won, who use the side cut kick a lot and he told me that they were constantly damaging their ankles. He always used to recommend kicking with your heel. My Sifu trained in Tae Kwon Do before taking up Wing Chun Kuen and was a superb kicker. Jo
yijing zhigang

use stillness to overcome movement
yat_chum
Forum God
 
Posts: 3141
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 7:18 am
Location: United Kingdom

Postby Psycrow » Thu Sep 22, 2005 3:57 pm

Thats a good point jo...

I guess i might try to practice it as Walter explained...

Walter Wong wrote:You need to practice the kicks on a punching bag. Learn how to get the power out. Make the punching bag fold in half from the impact of your kick. At that point, I say you'll do some damage to your opponent with that kick. Also if your leg is properly aligned with your hips and body, then it'll seem effortless to execute power. Kick the bag alot and find how to do damage with your kick.


I'll see if i can build up the endurance level of my ankles. Either way i'll train it to death over the next while! It's just such a nice kick! hehe... i think i'm obsessed... 8)
"You point; I punch"
Psycrow
Forum User
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 10:34 am

Postby scramasax57 » Thu Sep 22, 2005 8:14 pm

i would actually recommend NOT training it to death. with any strike or kick that has a high potential of damaging your body (finger strikes, knuckle strike, mantis wrist strikes, side-cut kick, toe kick), i would definitely take it easy and allow your body to adapt. do it very low power, for not too long a time at first. this will help prevent damage and give your body time to condition. slowly work your way up to more power and frequency. don't rush it, or you could easily permanently damage your ankles.
aka eric hinds, 2nd stripe
n. andover, ma branch
yang's martial arts association

changchuan, baihe, and xingyi
scramasax57
Forum DemiGod
 
Posts: 661
Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2004 1:25 pm
Location: andover

Postby Walter Wong » Fri Sep 23, 2005 7:47 am

Build up to it like scramasax said. Train alot, but train in moderation. Listen to how your body feels. There's a difference in taking it easy if your body's & mind's fatigued or burnt out from training and a difference from taking it easy cause of feeling lazy. Feeling lazy's not an excuse to take it easy. Feeling fatigued in mind/body & or burnt out from training is ok to take it easy or take a break. Your body needs time to heal from the abuse your body goes through from training.
Shaolin and Liu He Ba Fa instructor of Boston YMAA Headquarters
Walter Wong
Forum God
 
Posts: 1091
Joined: Thu Nov 20, 2003 11:22 am
Location: Boston, Massachusetts (United States)


Return to Shaolin Gong Fu / Kung Fu

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

©2013 YMAA | About YMAA | Privacy Policy |Terms of Use | Permissions | Contact Us