And then I switch the blade...

Discuss Taijiquan or other soft styles. Theory, practice and applications. Please stay on topic.

Moderators: Dvivid, Inga, nyang, taiqiman

And then I switch the blade...

Postby caesar » Tue Jun 12, 2012 3:47 pm

Hi folks!

I ran into another MA forum (Yes I'm Judas) where I found a topic that I've been thinking about for a while. The writer asks people that should one practice on both sides? The person asking is apparently doing taichichuan.

Now in many martial arts every single technique or move is practiced on both sides. Taichichuan is the second martial art to me where the question doesn't seem to have any absolute answer.

Here is the link to the topic:
http://www.wle.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1365

And here I quote a few comments from the thread:

Q: Should one practice the form on the right and left sides? I've always wanted to know what people thought about that.

A: Why? If Sun wanted his students to practice both left and right, he would already have it in his TC set. If you practice long enough, the brain adjusts and you will discover that it really makes no difference if the move is done on the left or right. You learn to adjust.

Q: The reason I ask is that TT Liang, the long lived and famous Yang Style Teacher, practiced all his forms even weapons on both sides. It seems to make more sense to me that the form should be learned on one side and then on the other.

A: AFAIK, Sun did not advocate this practice. Would it be beneficial? I don't know anyone in the Sun line who has done it so your mileage may vary. On the otherhand, maybe it's better to just good with what is given. In the set, some things are done both sides, others are not. May be a reason.

A: I practice a lot of the techniques on both sides as individual line drills... So many techniques are practiced on both sides in the form though, that re-teaching yourself the entire form in reverse doesn't seem very productive to me.



So...In a former art I asked a couple of times different instructors, should techniques or katas (which were usually only practiced one-sidedly) be also trained from the other side? I never really got a clear answer...actually I got quite differing opinions from different instructors. Also there where techniques and katas which were always practiced both-sidedly, more basic ones. And it seemed more advanced ones were usually mostly practiced one-sidedly.

I'm pretty new to tai chi and I've learned the long form. But it still needs a lot of practice for me to learn to relax and bypass tensions. Now when I'm struggling with a move...and I'm "externally" doing it "right", but still feeling that I'm too tense...I might do the move a couple of times from the other side, it takes a short while to get it symmetrically correct. But once I can do it from the other side without having to put too much effort on concentration, I switch back to the "right" side and often suddenly notice that I'm doing the move much more relaxed and smoothly from the "right" side compared to how tense I was before I switched the sides in the first place!

I think it's basically the same thing that I sometimes do when cooking in the kitchen...if I have time. I start cutting vegetables, let's say onions. Blade on my right hand and naturally holding the onion still with my left hand. I can do it very fast and and move on to the next onion. So sometimes I start thinking how much tension does my body have while cutting the vegetables that I'm not aware of? How much unnecessary force am I putting on the cutting hand? Can I hold the onion still with less force? Being more relaxed?

And then I switch the blade to my left hand and keep on cutting from the other side. What happens then? I must slow down to the rate that it would take me 20 minutes per onion. Suddenly the same motoric move I've done forever has to be done with great awareness from left side (so I don't cut myself) and the slowness really forces me to focus on keeping my shoulders relaxed, keep on breathing etc. After that I switch again to right side, and usually at this point I notice how smoothly and fluidly I actually cut the onion and how much I actually did have tension when started to cook! It's cool to be relaxed before the dinner is ready. :)

I think this same feeling and method can be applied to martial arts training, or actually to any physical activity we do. I sometimes tend to do also other physical stuff other-sidedly, and I think it always pays off somehow. I believe the nervous system improves by this and mind-body is more balanced.

One teacher said that it's not necessary to do the moves of tai chi from the other side, if not for health reasons...then again, some say something like..."the more healthy and relaxed your tai chi is, the better the martial side." Contradiction or not?

Then I also wonder about those who immediately answer "No! One side is enough." Are they actually understanding the questioner right? Are they actually misunderstanding the question as: "Should I start to do the whole form also from the other side every single morning in addition to the 'right' side?"

I've studied the form a couple of times from the other side just for interest. But mostly my "other side training" consists of training individual moves which are difficult for me. Also it's fun to test a technique to a partner from the other side. I believe it's never bad, if you have to break something obvious to you into pieces and collect them again and then see how the pieces connect this time.

What do you think?
caesar
Forum Guru
 
Posts: 205
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:08 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby wpgtaiji » Tue Jun 12, 2012 6:27 pm

Ok. This is NOT as cut and dry as you would like it to be, nor is it as easy to accept, and to make matters worse, if you are doing a style that is not "complete", then we have a whole other set of issues.

First, you DO NOT need to relax! Why on earth would you have to relax to do taiji? Oh right! Cuz that is what everyone says!!! Idiots (not you)! The movements of taiji SHOULD put you into a state of "calm" or relaxed. It is the form that does the work. You shouldnt have to be relaxed FIRST! If that is the case, you may have the incorrect form or your understanding of that form may be incorrect. Sorry, this is an aside to your main question, but it is one of my pet peeves! :)

Ok, if the art you are doing is TECHNIQUE based, then YES, you would or should do the forms on both the right and the left sides to get a balance. Taiji, as it SHOULD be taught (and that is a huge SHOULD), is not technique based. The postures are actually only ONE long movement. When we take a posture, in actuality, that posture does not EVER exist, so there is nothing. Because that is the reality of taiji, why on earth would you need to do it on the other side? You dont. That said, Yang taiji (as it is taught in the WTBA) has the Yang form (old yang) and then later on, the Pauchui, which does the postures on the other side (for the most part).

So the short answer is NO. However, if you are being taught on the other side, that is fine (I have friends who do it, and i have done the Chenfu form on the other side). Just be aware that there are no techniques.

Sorry about that vagueness. It is hard to explain in words ( and i dont have the time ). Peace and good luck
wpgtaiji
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:48 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby caesar » Tue Jun 12, 2012 11:49 pm

wpgtaiji wrote:Ok. This is NOT as cut and dry as you would like it to be, nor is it as easy to accept, and to make matters worse, if you are doing a style that is not "complete", then we have a whole other set of issues.


Well I'm still doing Yang style by the Dong family tradition. I don't know how complete it looks to a WTBA-practitioner.

wpgtaiji wrote:First, you DO NOT need to relax! Why on earth would you have to relax to do taiji? Oh right! Cuz that is what everyone says!!! Idiots (not you)! The movements of taiji SHOULD put you into a state of "calm" or relaxed. It is the form that does the work. You shouldnt have to be relaxed FIRST! If that is the case, you may have the incorrect form or your understanding of that form may be incorrect. Sorry, this is an aside to your main question, but it is one of my pet peeves! :)


Could you explain a little more specific what you mean? In another post you said that your zhang zhuang position was corrected by an instructor, and after that you started feeling better while doing it...ZZ and TCC are close, are you then claiming that unlike in ZZ, the form training should "automatically" feel good? I mean people have permanent injuries, learned tendencies, weak deeper muscles, the mind-body out of balance. I myself believe that whatever form you do, these issues might prevent from instantly starting to get the "relaxed feeling" especially when a beginner. I wouldn't say that the form I study is incorrect, but I'm more than sure that my understanding of it is. And back to the topic, I think doing sometimes both-sidedly is one way of learning to understand the form better.

wpgtaiji wrote:Ok, if the art you are doing is TECHNIQUE based, then YES, you would or should do the forms on both the right and the left sides to get a balance. Taiji, as it SHOULD be taught (and that is a huge SHOULD), is not technique based. The postures are actually only ONE long movement. When we take a posture, in actuality, that posture does not EVER exist, so there is nothing. Because that is the reality of taiji, why on earth would you need to do it on the other side? You dont. That said, Yang taiji (as it is taught in the WTBA) has the Yang form (old yang) and then later on, the Pauchui, which does the postures on the other side (for the most part).


Ok, let me correct one thing. When I was talking about techniques, I actually meant applications. Sorry for the english, I really don't make a clear distinction between those two. Then you asked: "why on earth would you need to do it on the other side?"...well, doesn't my onion chopping theory satisfy you? ;)

wpgtaiji wrote:So the short answer is NO. However, if you are being taught on the other side, that is fine (I have friends who do it, and i have done the Chenfu form on the other side). Just be aware that there are no techniques.


Just for interest...I kinda fear what your answer's gonna be but why have you particularly trained the Cheng Fu form from both sides then and not others?

wpgtaiji wrote:Sorry about that vagueness. It is hard to explain in words ( and i dont have the time ). Peace and good luck


No problem, thank you anyway for your opinions.
caesar
Forum Guru
 
Posts: 205
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:08 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby Josh Young » Wed Jun 13, 2012 12:41 am

It is a good thing to practice, but not required.

You can do left and right versions of the Push Hands patterns too.

I've put countless hours into doing Grasp Sparrows Tail on both sides and have benefited.

In our lineage a few moments are spent preparing for the form by relaxing, usually three calming breaths... and then the form begins. :wink:
Josh Young
Forum DemiGod
 
Posts: 720
Joined: Fri Mar 06, 2009 12:03 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby wpgtaiji » Wed Jun 13, 2012 8:42 am

caesar wrote:Well I'm still doing Yang style by the Dong family tradition. I don't know how complete it looks to a WTBA-practitioner.

Mate, it has nothing what so ever to do with anyone else' opinion. I refer ONLY to the art itself. If you havent been taught an aspect (like doing things on both sides, for example), then one wonders if it is complete REGARDLESS of the style! Mate, there are many people who worked directly with Erle who missed things, and went out on their own to be "head" instructors.

Could you explain a little more specific what you mean? In another post you said that your zhang zhuang position was corrected by an instructor, and after that you started feeling better while doing it...ZZ and TCC are close, are you then claiming that unlike in ZZ, the form training should "automatically" feel good?

This is a bit more in depth than for what I have here. It isnt about INSTANT feeling good or whatever one feels is "relaxed". There are many people who have criticized Erle and how he taught and his interpretation of some chinese terms, and that is fine (he never cared much). That said, what he taught, the application of the way he taught, produced results, which is the bottom line. For example, take the word Sung. 99% of the taiji world translate that as Relax or some variant of that idea. Now, we have the majority of the taiji community teaching people to relax THEN move! I love a story from one of Cheng Man-ching's students who taught in a jail for a time. He was reiterating this to the inmates "Relax! Relax!" Finally, after a few sessions of them not caring, one inmate says to him "mate, what do we have to relax for? They give us stuff to relax us before you get here." What is the purpose of taiji then? For the most part, there isnt if you have to relax BEFORE you do it! Sung, as taught by Erle is "moving without feeling the movement". When you move this way, in harmony and balance, then your body disappears. You arent trying to relax, you are relax.. if that makes sense (and that word isnt correct, i am just using it for your example).

In other words, it is the way you move in taiji which brings the "calmness", and not the other way around (meaning, you dont have to be calm first!) Hope that helps a bit

Ok, let me correct one thing. When I was talking about techniques, I actually meant applications. Sorry for the english, I really don't make a clear distinction between those two. Then you asked: "why on earth would you need to do it on the other side?"...well, doesn't my onion chopping theory satisfy you? ;)

This is the hardest thing for people to get (it took me 20+ years to understand it). If you rely on techniques or applications, then you loose. A martial art should teach you to move in a co-ordinated and united way with balance and timing. That is it. Taiji is NOT a series of techniques linked together, although, each posture can have a multitude of techniques that come out of it. One posture which is very important (and most styles seem to ignore for some reason) is the basis of much of our "self defence" (not the same as martial art). In learning this posture, we teach it one way, but as the student grows in understanding, that same movement is used in a whole host of other methods, stuff people would never consider when they first learned it in their second or third lesson on taiji.
Just for interest...I kinda fear what your answer's gonna be but why have you particularly trained the Cheng Fu form from both sides then and not others?

This isnt bad (depending on your form i guess). Taiji is not a series of techniques (as i mentioned above). In most Yang forms (not any numbered forms as they are just for total beginners), we do snake creeps down on ONE side, for example. Strictly from a physical stand point, most Yang forms are PHYSICALLY imbalanced, meaning, one side will be worked more than the other. The old yang form is physically balanced in that not only do we do snake creeps down, but we also have other postures which physically balance out that posture, hence it is not necessary to do it on the other side.

As to "other" forms, some of the other forms (wudang forms, for example) could possibly be done on the other side, however, there are specific movements in each of those that MUST be done the same way, forward and reverse, thus the 2 forms will not look the same at those points, and can be very difficult to perform because the flow would be totally different.

mate, it really doesnt matter. I know guys that do the old yang form on the other side with no troubles. Like Josh says, Grasp Swallows tail sequence is a MUST on both sides (Erle's words paraphrased). Erle in fact, when he taught chenfu form, he encouraged his students to do it 3 times, normal, opposite, normal again, for the physical balance (stretch on legs mostly).

Hope that helps a bit. Any other questions, just put 'em here (or PM me is fine).
wpgtaiji
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:48 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby Dvivid » Wed Jun 13, 2012 8:58 am

There is no overarching rule on this topic. Some teachers advocate training to both sides, others don't.

For purely health reasons, its a good idea.

1. to strive for symmetry in the body, ie. equal strength,flexibility and balance on both sides.
2. to develop the energetic circulation equally, by training the intention focusing on both sides of the body.
3. good for your brains to practice any non-dominant side movement.

Sunrise Tai Chi and Sunset Tai Chi forms are both taught to the left and the right.
http://ymaa.com/publishing/tai_chi_DVD/ ... ai_chi_DVD
"Avoid Prejudice, Be Objective in Your Judgement, Be Scientific, Be Logical and Make Sense, Do Not Ignore Prior Experience." - Dr. Yang

http://www.ymaa.com/publishing
Dvivid
Forum God
 
Posts: 1674
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 9:48 am
Location: Boston, MA

Maybe I'm an idiot...

Postby nitsuj » Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:42 am

Try this simple experiment before working on your form:
day 1. Begin your practice with standing meditation for 5 minutes.
day 2. Begin your practice blasting some Iron Maiden while doing a heavy bag workout or some high intensity shadow boxing for 5 min.

Which day is your taiji better?

I practice Chen style, so I might not be speaking your language, but I like to start my practice with a couple minutes standing, deep breathing; followed by some silk reeling, and a gentle run through of the Baduanjin, or YiYinJing. A gentle, RELAXING warm-up helps my taiji greatly. When fine tuning my form, RELAXING unneeded tension is key to making things "flow" right.
Sure, you can jump right in and practice, and I'm sure that, if you're practicing mindfully, you will certainly relax--- but taking 5-10 minutes, or longer, to work on relaxing the mind and body, as well as work on drills that focus on key theoretical concepts, certainly won't hurt.

As far as relying on the movements themselves to release and relax, and the form doing all the work, I suspect this may go against the principle of using Yi to lead Qi; a core concept of Dr. Yang's Qigong/Taiji theory. It is WE that control the form, not the other way around. Then again, maybe I'm just an idiot. :mrgreen:

As far as bilateral training goes, I'm sure it wouldn't hurt to spend time on splitting up the form into short segments and working on both sides. In Laojia Er Lu ( The Chen form I'm focusing on right now) , the form includes movements on both sides, so I'm not sweating this so much personally. When working on martial applications: work both sides.
nitsuj
Forum Addict
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2006 1:05 am
Location: Santa Rosa, CA

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby caesar » Wed Jun 20, 2012 2:20 am

Thanks Nitsuj! I think you had some good points. Although I prefer switching Iron Maiden to some dark drum & base ;)

As patience's been growing, I've started giving myself more ime to do relaxing exercises before form practice. Yeah, it does help!
caesar
Forum Guru
 
Posts: 205
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:08 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby pete5770 » Thu Jun 21, 2012 12:52 pm

I'm going to go along with "wpgtaiji" on the need to "relax". Lots of, so called, instructors just love to tell people that the three main rules of Tai Chi are "relax, relax, relax" and it gets repeated over and over until it becomes a sort of rule in and of itself.
As for left and right, I don't see why it would create any issues. We're exercising here and that's
a good thing. To me it's all about how much time you're willing to or capable of giving to whatever martial art you're into that determines how deeply you can delve into it. If you have 8 hours a day you can dedicate to Tai Chi then you have plenty of time to get into all aspects of the art. However if you have friends, family, home, a job, and all the other "stuff" that life is full of you simply won't have time to "do it all". You can either learn very little about a whole lot or a whole lot about a few things, and that's the choice you have to make. I vote for really getting into a few parts of Tai Chi that peak your interest instead of trying "know it all" because that won't work.
pete5770
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 560
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:16 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby wpgtaiji » Fri Jun 22, 2012 11:18 am

pete5770 wrote:As for left and right, I don't see why it would create any issues. We're exercising here and that's
a good thing.

I am more than likely asking the wrong dude here (seeing that you dont believe in Qi.. but here it goes), if taiji is just "exercise", then why not do something much better suited for that purpose (like swimming, running, jump rope, or even walking). Waving your arms in the air slowly and call it exercising makes about as much sense to me as playing golf or tennis without a ball, but that is me! Maybe you have an understand that what passes for taiji today is "exercise", but what i see done my most people couldnt even be called exercise, forget about a martial art.

*had to edit the rest
wpgtaiji
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:48 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby pete5770 » Fri Jun 22, 2012 4:47 pm

wpgtaiji wrote:
pete5770 wrote:As for left and right, I don't see why it would create any issues. We're exercising here and that's
a good thing.

I am more than likely asking the wrong dude here (seeing that you dont believe in Qi.. but here it goes), if taiji is just "exercise", then why not do something much better suited for that purpose (like swimming, running, jump rope, or even walking). Waving your arms in the air slowly and call it exercising makes about as much sense to me as playing golf or tennis without a ball, but that is me!



I know what you're saying and tend to agree. Key word being "tend". Just wouldn't be right for me to completely agree with anyone on anything. :wink: Is Tai Chi exercise? Yes and no. Every kind of "exercise" can be either good for you or basically usless depending on the intensity. For me, doing Yang long form for an hour or two in a nice deep stance is one tough couple of hours.
However, like you say, most of what you see today is aimed at couch potatoes, old folks, the infirm, and the like. Not that that is a bad thing but I haven't seen anyone really working at Tai Chi in quite a while. Seems like a lot of people like it because it's "easy". I have an "instructor?"
friend who always tells people that if it hurts don't do it, stop. They love to hear that kind of BS because it means the minute things get even the least bit difficult, their excuse to stop is already there.
pete5770
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 560
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:16 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby wpgtaiji » Sat Jun 23, 2012 7:55 am

LOL If it hurts dont do it?? OMG!

I asked a question in the Repulse Monkey topic a long while ago and no one ever answered it. Why? Because most probably thought i was being crazy. I was not. In other topics I also talked about what we call Post stepping.

When you watch people do taiji, you can tell in an instant, if they have any sort of understanding in the least. Take the postures Wave Hands in Clouds, for example. A relatively simple movement of the arms with steps taken to the left. I ALWAYS watch the feet. 99.999999% of people (outside the WTBA, and 50% of the people in the WTBA) do not lift the foot as one unit. In other words, they pick the foot up as if walking (first heel, then toes). What good is doing it that way?

So why do we pick up the foot as one unit (heel and toe together at the same time)? We believe that part of what Taiji is designed to do is circulate qi through the body (through meridians). In this posture, it is repeated so many times in the long form because it works on the Stomach (and by correspondence, Spleen). If you look at acupuncture books, you find that both these meridians run up the legs (or down). In order to activate them CORRECTLY, we pick up the foot as one unit. Also, when you first start to do it (actually all the time, but you get used to it), it feels like you are lifting your foot with your stomach!

Some of you may be scratching your heads, that is fine. When i was learning this, I asked Erle HOW to do it, and he literally told me to stop being a wimp and pick your foot up heel/toe together! DO IT!

btw, the same is for Repulse Monkey. The front foot is picked up heel/toe together as one unit, then it is placed behind you on the ball of the foot and you roll onto the heel. We say it is a Liver/Gall Bladder posture, and if you look at the meridians, you can start to see why this is important (we also do a different sort of Repulse Monkey, and in this posture, we pick up the foot rolling, but it is placed down as ONE unit).

Or, you can just do silly slow movements... Makes a lot of sense to me.
wpgtaiji
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:48 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby pete5770 » Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:47 pm

wpgtaiji wrote:In other topics I also talked about what we call Post stepping.

When you watch people do taiji, you can tell in an instant, if they have any sort of understanding in the least. Take the postures Wave Hands in Clouds, for example. A relatively simple movement of the arms with steps taken to the left. I ALWAYS watch the feet. 99.999999% of people (outside the WTBA, and 50% of the people in the WTBA) do not lift the foot as one unit. In other words, they pick the foot up as if walking (first heel, then toes). What good is doing it that way?



I guess we are starting to vary from the original post but what the heck. In any case my "take"
on what you might call Tai Chi walking / stepping has always been to tell people to imagine they are in walking through a dark room with toys all over the floor(which you can't see). Not wanting to trip or step on these things I ask them how they would accomplish getting from one side of the room to the other. After a while most of them come up with the idea of standing on one leg, finding the floor or clear spot with the other foot, and THEN shifting their weight onto that foot.
Repeat till you've crossed the room. It's a very easy and basic idea and I believe it conveys the basic's of Tai Chi footwork. Find / confirm the floor is there first, then shift weight.
pete5770
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 560
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:16 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby wpgtaiji » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:59 pm

Pretty much what i was saying. Nothing but ordinary walking done slowly! No worries. Most people have no idea.
wpgtaiji
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:48 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby pete5770 » Sat Jun 23, 2012 4:52 pm

wpgtaiji wrote: Nothing but ordinary walking done slowly!


I sort of disagree(gee, go figure). Ordinary walking involves shifting the bodies weight toward the extended foot before it even touches the ground. This works for walking because you assume and or know that there is a floor there and can see any obstacales. Tai Chi, on the other hand(IMHO) requires that you do not even start any weight shifting from your weight bearing leg until your other foot sort of confirms that the ground / floor is, in fact, THERE and without obstacales. I call it finding the floor. Then you start weight shifts. This might seem like taking stability to the extreme but I think keeping yourself on your feet is the main thing in martial arts. All that hand waving is just so much, well, hand waving, but staying upright, now that's important. Fighting someone off when you're on the ground is not good strategy or a good idea. :wink:
pete5770
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 560
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:16 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby wpgtaiji » Sat Jun 23, 2012 11:14 pm

pete, you dont even understand the fundamentals of taiji (qi for example), so how on earth are you one to talk about basics. In short, because of your previous posts, you have no street cred on anything regarding taiji, at least to me.

Walking is walking mate. I dont care if you do it slow or fast, it is still the same motion. What i refered to was NOT walking. I would ask you to try it, but that would be a mistake because you dont understand the basics.
wpgtaiji
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:48 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby pete5770 » Sun Jun 24, 2012 5:29 am

wpgtaiji wrote:pete, you dont even understand the fundamentals of taiji (qi for example), so how on earth are you one to talk about basics. In short, because of your previous posts, you have no street cred on anything regarding taiji, at least to me.

Walking is walking mate. I dont care if you do it slow or fast, it is still the same motion. What i refered to was NOT walking. I would ask you to try it, but that would be a mistake because you dont understand the basics.


I wondered how long it would take you to revert to your real self. Welcome back.
pete5770
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 560
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:16 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby wpgtaiji » Sun Jun 24, 2012 12:41 pm

pete5770 wrote:
I wondered how long it would take you to revert to your real self. Welcome back.


I am sorry mate. Did i ever give you the impression that i thought you had any understanding of taiji? I am not sure HOW you got that idea, but if you did, i apologize for letting you think that. I consider you to be a part of the vast majority that have harmed taiji's image, and have made taiji fit for old people and the infirm, not the great MARTIAL art it is. If you have taken offense, look in the mirror. You describe simple walking but SLOW and expect the rest of us to bow down in reverence! That is BS, and the worst is, YOU KNOW IT! You are no better than the woman you claim taught the "fat guy" qigong to make him slim. You teach something you dont even believe in, yet expect those of us who understand the art to welcome you. No mate. Won't happen. I call a spade a spade and you are the worst kind of spade (a rusty old shovel).

That they still allow you to post your "ideas" without proof that you actually understand any of it is beyond me. Dvivid is a saint in that respect.

I cannot believe that you feel that, because you have moved slowly for 40 years that you think we should consider what you do taiji! It is beyond me. You said you would put up video and you havent (i wonder why? LOL) Until you prove that you understand ONE thing about taiji and can actually do that one thing, you shouldnt expect people to agree with you, nor give any of your ideas acceptance.

As far as i can tell, you are a troll (seeing that you are treated harshly on 2 forums at least, in your words)... look in the mirror mate. Move on to contemporary dance or whatever you are really doing cuz it isnt taiji.
wpgtaiji
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:48 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby Josh Young » Sun Jun 24, 2012 5:08 pm

Gord, Pete;

Why not create a blog for you two to share together so you can insult one another without it detracting from the experience of others?
Josh Young
Forum DemiGod
 
Posts: 720
Joined: Fri Mar 06, 2009 12:03 pm

Re: And then I switch the blade...

Postby wpgtaiji » Sun Jun 24, 2012 10:59 pm

Josh Young wrote:Gord, Pete;

Why not create a blog for you two to share together so you can insult one another without it detracting from the experience of others?

Why is there no LIKE button?? LOL Thanks Josh. I am apologize for my post. I have lost any semblance of civility with a person who claims to have studied an art for 40 years, yet has no understanding of the fundamentals of said study.
wpgtaiji
Forum ÜberGuru
 
Posts: 397
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 10:48 pm

Next

Return to Taijiquan / Tai Chi Chuan

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron
©2013 YMAA | About YMAA | Privacy Policy |Terms of Use | Permissions | Contact Us