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Book: Enzan: The Far Mountain by John Donohue

Product Information

Book: Paperback

Availability: In Stock and Ready to Ship—Cart Button

Pages: 294

Code: B2818

ISBN: 9781594392818

Release Date: July 2014

Skill Level: Skill level 1 recomended Skill Level 2 Skill Level 3

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List Price: $12.95

Chie Miyazaki is wild and spoiled—the pampered child of a cadet line of the Imperial house of Japan. When she disappears in the United States accompanied by a slick Korean boyfriend, it sets off alarms among elite officials in Japan’s security apparatus.

The Japanese want the problem solved quietly, so they seek out Connor Burke, prize student of Sensei Yamashita. Burke suspects that he’s being used, but he accepts the assignment out of honor for his revered sensei.

A covert search and rescue operation turns into a confrontation with a North Korean sleeper cell, and Burke finally discovers the secret that drove Yamashita from Japan so many years ago and the power behind the decades-old connections that pull Yamashita back into danger in the service of the imperial family.

John Donohue, Ph.D.

John Donohue, Ph.D. is a nationally know expert on the culture and practice of the martial arts, John Donohue has been banging around dojo for more than 30 years.

AWARDS

WINNER GOLD – 2015 Benjamin Franklin Award. Mystery/Suspense

Finalist – 2014 USA Best Book Award. Mystery/Thriller

Kirkus Reviews

Multi-layered and satisfying, a welcome and well-developed addition to an accomplished martial arts series.

ForeWord Reviews

A Zen master, a princess, and a martial artist burst out of their archetypes to reveal deep and likable characters.

Heartland Reviews

North Korean thugs, the Japanese family, an Hispanic gangster, a retired cop, a nymphomaniac girl, and a Zen monastery. Mix all these with a variety of agendas and you have an incredible basis for a “can’t put it down” novel. We rated this novel our max 5-heart rating.

Michael DeMarco, founder of Journal of Asian Martial Arts

Read Enzan and you’ll sense sharp swords somewhere in proximity. Read it, and you’re involved in the multi-layered, pulsating life that can only be found in a book about Connor Burke.

Arthur Rosenfeld for Huffington Post

What makes this book worth the review, and worth your reading time is ... Donohue’s wise, asides ... regarding martial arts, Japanese culture, and Zen influences. [They] lend Enzan its true promise—namely to render traditional martial arts practice as a way of living relevant to the warp and woof of the modern world. Doing so lifts John Donohue’s work into the mainstream of crime/adventure fiction.

James Grady, author of Six Days of the Condor

A classic Japanese structured myth of a questing warrior... set in our modern thriller struggles. Authentic and exciting!

David J. Montgomery, mystery and thriller critic for Mystery Ink

When it comes to martial arts action and suspense, John Donohue is the grandmaster. I’m a big Connor Burke fan!

Loren Christensen, (ret) police officer, Portland P.D., martial artists, author of Dukkha (series)

It’s great to see Burke and Yamashita back in another martial arts action adventure. Told by a hard-hitting writer and martial arts expert, John Donohue is at the top of his game.

Brian R. Sheridan, martial artist, author of American Life in the 1930’s

Donohue equals Eisler and Van Lustbader as a fiction writer who deftly mixes a crackling plot, martial arts action, and vivid characters, for an unforgettable thrill ride.

Meron Langsner, award-winning playwright

In this installment, Donohue skillfully weaves parallel narratives wherein the secrets of the past have powerful consequences for the present, and even the most jaded readers will be caught by surprise by the secrets that are exposed.

Dr. Susan Lynn Peterson, author of Western Herbs for Martial Artists and Contact Athletes

A meaty story that can be read as a darn good thriller, or as a study in human nature, or as a commentary on the traditions and inner workings of the martial art. Pick it up on Friday night when you don’t have to be at work Saturday morning. If you’re like me, you’ll be up half the night reading—just one more chapter.

Award




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