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Treating Thyroid Problems with Natural Medicine
December 21, 2009
Thyroid problems are very common in the United States. The thyroid hormone influences almost all of the metabolic processes in your body.
Beyond Your Barehand Taiji Form (太極拳套)
November 4, 2009
Once you have learned a basic Taiji form, whether you study Yang, Chen, or another style, there is still a great deal that traditional Taijiquan training can offer.
The Swine Flu and You
October 28, 2009
Many people have a significant fear about the Swine Flu. This worry generates anxiety, worry, and sometimes even panic. The Swine Flu is not very different from the ordinary flu. The same caution is required.
Chinese Healthy and Balanced Diet
October 23, 2009
Simple Chinese Medicine—A Beginner’s Guide to Natural Healing & Well Being by Dr. Aihan Khun, emphasizes the need for a healthy balanced diet the Chinese Way
Lessons from the Taijiquan Form Seminar
September 17, 2009
I had the chance last weekend to teach at the YMAA Boston Taiji Form Seminar. I was tapped to teach the Two Person Fighting Set. YMAA canon maintains that the Fighting Set is the last thing a person trains prior to free sparring.
Traditional Chinese Health - A Simple and Light Diet - July 16, 2009
Food provides nutrients for the maintenance of bodily function and and growth. Good dietary practices insure your health and longevity. Through the years, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has developed systematic theories, principles, and methods that have contributed a great deal to the health and longevity of the Chinese people.
Shaolin: the Root of Taijiquan - June 23, 2009
After Bodhidharma (Da Mo) passed down his qigong (chi kung) theory at Shaolin Temple around 550 A.D., the Shaolin monks trained the cultivation of Qi, and realized that muscular power could be enhanced to a tremendous level, which could make martial techniques more powerful and effective.
Balance Between Work and Rest - May 26, 2009
Throughout history mankind has had to work and struggle against nature in order to survive. In doing so, however, one must work within the limits of his or her tolerance and must rest to release tension caused by work.
Taiji Chin Na - Martial Application - May 4, 2009
Taijiquan was originally developed for combat in ancient times. Its fighting theory is to use the soft against the hard, and to use the round to neutralize the straight or square.
The True Quality of Tai Chi - April 20, 2009
What is Tai Chi? How does Tai Chi improve health? People ask me these questions all the time. Some ask because they see so many people doing these exercises in the park. Others ask because they can hardly believe there can be any benefits from such slow body movements.
Coping with Jet Lag - April 13, 2009
As a pilot for Continental Airlines traveling the globe, I thought it would nice to share with you some ideas about coping with a common problem called jet lag.
Taiji and Qigong - April 6, 2009
Those who practice both Taiji and Qigong as separate arts soon realize that Qigong is included among the many layers encompassed by Taiji. Knowingly doing Taiji movement as Qigong not only adds the benefits of Qigong but also improves the quality of the Taiji movements.
Senior Moments #2: Taiji, Happy Toes, and Piano Fingers - February 17, 2009
So how does one teach Taijiquan to seniors, rehabbers, and the generally unfit? Consult the ancients, "The best leader follows." These people are generally coming to Taiji because of a life urgency (old age, sickness, injury, etc.) which has created an opportunity for change.
Senior Moments #1: "Because we can't" - January 30, 2009
Back in the day of the last millennia, I had my first venture into teaching Martial Arts to the elderly. I secured a nice gig at the local senior center. There were about twenty intrepid explorers ready for the unknown.
The Importance of Breathing in Martial Arts - January 1, 2009
According to Survival Topics, you can survive without food for about three to six months. You can live without water for two to ten days. Without air, however, the average person will die, or at least suffer severe brain damage, in three to five minutes.