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The Three Golden Rules
December 24, 2012
1. You and your partners go home safely at the end of each and every shift. 2.The criminal goes to jail. 3. Liability free. The three golden rules, first written by Dep. Paul McRedmond of the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, must be the basis of all officer training.
A Police Officer’s View of Scaling Force
September 3, 2012
Fights are dynamic and chaotic situations. A simple escort hold, walking a drunk off the premises can turn into a knife fight or a struggle for your weapon in an instant. Or you and several other officers could be fighting against a large, vicious threat who is acting completely inhuman and have him suddenly go limp.
Training Theories of Southern White Crane Styles
August 13, 2012
Training theories are the root of every style. From understanding these theories, the actions or techniques are derived. If you train contrary to Crane style theories, then the techniques you are performing cannot be considered Crane style.
White Crane Gongfu Training Key Points
August 7, 2012
The Crane is a weak animal without much strength to use in fighting. However, when necessary, it can defend itself very effectively. A Crane defending itself relies on only three things: the ability to jump, the breaking power of its wings, and the pecking of the beak.
Key Points of Shaolin White Crane Kung Fu
August 6, 2012
The Crane is a weak animal without much strength to use in fighting. However, when necessary, it can defend itself very effectively. A Crane defending itself relies on only three things: the ability to jump, the breaking power of its wings, and the pecking of the beak.
An Introduction to Force Decisions - April 30, 2012
This book (Force Decisions) is a gift, a peace offering. It is an attempt to communicate across a vast gulf in culture and experience, the gulf that exists between the Law Enforcement community and those whom they protect.
How to Evaluate a Force Decision - April 16, 2012
Fighting is ugly. Killing is ugly. Getting involved in any force incident is dangerous and it hurts. Violence affects humans at a very deep emotional level, and when we see or hear of an act of violence most people are sickened or outraged. And our default assumption is that anything that sickens or angers us so much must be wrong.