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Cultivating Observation—Caring for Others
November 23, 2020
"The great learning of the Dao is to pursue comprehension of the bright De (i.e., the manifestation of the Dao) and to influence other people until the ultimate goodness can be reached. Once you know, then your mind is steady without doubts. When the mind is steady, then you are able to acquire calmness. When you are calm, then you find peace. When you are at peace, then you are able to ponder. When you are able to ponder, then you gain. All objects have their initiation and ending and all matters have a beginning and expiration. If one knows the beginning and the end, then one is closer to the Dao."
Theories of Yin-Yang and Kan-Li 陰陽、坎離之理論
March 4, 2019
To practice qigong accurately, you must not only understand the theory but also the correct methods of practice. Knowing the theory correctly places a clear and accurate map in your hands leading you to your goal in the shortest time. Without this map, you may take many years to find the correct path.
Subtle Clarity—Yin and Yang Lao Tzu, Translation and Commentary
February 25, 2019
It is clear that in order to expand something, it must first shrink. It is the same when you want to weaken it: first you should strengthen it. In order to reduce it, you must first build it up. Also, in order to take it, first you must give. This is the theory of yin and yang, which always balance each other.
Think of Beginning—Advance Gradually Lao Tzu, Translation and Commentary
January 6, 2019
The Nature has always developed gradually. For those who are cultivating the Dao, the final goal is "doing without doing" (wuwei, 無為). However, to reach this level, you must begin with the easy and small. Only after you are able to take care of easy and small matters should you then gradually advance into more difficult and bigger matters.
Guiding and Leading (Humility)-Putting Oneself Behind
December 10, 2018
As a leader, humility is the most important prerequisite to lead the people. The book Shu (《書‧大禹謨》) said: “(Those) satisfied will cause damage and (those) humble will acquire benefits.” This is because those who are humble can take a low position, be open-minded, and be willing to learn; thus they gain. Those who are satisfied and proud of themselves will not listen and learn from others; thus they lose. The Book of Changes (《易‧謙》) said: “Those who are humble and again humble always use their modest personality to restrain themselves.”
The Meaning of Taiji - July 18, 2008
Taijiquan (Tai Chi Chuan) is an internal style of martial arts that was created in the Daoist monastery of the Wudang mountain, Hubei Province.
Self Qigong Massage, part 2 - April 30, 2008
Although many of the purposes of self-massage are obvious, from the view of Qigong, its functions are wider and more profound. Let's review these purposes so you have a clearer understanding of the "why" of this practice.
Self Qigong Massage, part 2 - April 30, 2008
Although many of the purposes of self-massage are obvious, from the view of Qigong, its functions are wider and more profound. Let's review these purposes so you have a clearer understanding of the "why" of this practice.
Self Qigong Massage, part 1 - April 13, 2008
Self-massage is a natural human instinct to soothe the mind/spirit and ease discomfort in the body. There are many examples of this. If you accidentally get hit with a hard object, you naturally rub the hurt place to lessen the pain and also to keep a bruise from forming.
Self Qigong Massage, part 1 - April 13, 2008
Self-massage is a natural human instinct to soothe the mind/spirit and ease discomfort in the body. There are many examples of this. If you accidentally get hit with a hard object, you naturally rub the hurt place to lessen the pain and also to keep a bruise from forming.
How to Avoid Common Injuries in Your Martial Arts Training - April 1, 2008
Injuries to the hands are common in the martial arts. This occurs because almost all martial artists condition their hands to increase their power and destructive potential.
A Brief History of the Chinese Martial Arts - March 7, 2008
The beginning of Chinese martial arts probably started long before history was recorded. Martial techniques were discovered or created during the long epoch of continuous conflict between humanity and animals, or between different tribes of humans themselves.
A Brief History of Qigong - February 28, 2008
It is known that the Chinese art of Qigong has a history that goes back over 5,000 years, though only a few historical documents exist today. Qigong can be roughly divided into four periods.
YMAA 25 Years - February 6, 2008
On October 1, 2007, YMAA celebrated its 25-Year Anniversary. There were many phone calls, letters and emails of congratulations.
Xin and Yi: Two Minds - January 1, 2008
If you are interested in learning Taijiquan, you must understand Yin and Yang, and their relationship with Taiji. Without knowing the theory and the Dao, your Taijiquan practice will be limited to the external forms and movements.
Martial Morality - December 6, 2007
Martial morality has always been a required discipline in Chinese martial arts society. Teachers have long considered martial morality to be the most important criterion for judging students, and they have made it the most important part of the training in the traditional Chinese martial arts.
Traditional Chinese Tai Chi and Kung Fu Silk Clothing - October 17, 2007
Traditional Chinese silk clothing has a long history, dating back to the 27th century BC. Once the skill of spinning silk, or sericulture, was discovered, the Chinese made silk exclusively for 3,000 years without divulging the secret of the process and it was a valuable commodity for trading.
A Return to the Ancient Way of Training - July 30, 2007
Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming has taught the benefits of Chinese culture and popularized traditional martial arts throughout the world.