Chin Na in Ground Fighting—Principles, Theory and Submission Holds | YMAA
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Chin Na in Ground Fighting—Principles, Theory and Submission Holds

by Al Arsenault, Joeseph Faulise

Explains the use of joint locks, pressure points, and bone displacement techniques for fighting encounters on the ground. Holding Techniques for immobilizing an opponent, principles and theory of these holds, identification and use of pressure points for offensive and defensive purposes.

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SKU:
B663
Release date: 
June 1, 2003
Paperback: 448 pages
Dimensions: 
9.29 × 7.34 × 0.75 in
ISBN: 9781886969667
This item is eligible for free shipping (Conditions apply).
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Effective Techniques for all Martial Arts Styles

Chin Na is the controlling art of Chinese Kung Fu and is a part of many non-Chinese martial styles. The application of Chin Na can be applied to any empty hand fighting discipline.

Chin Na in Ground Fighting explores the use of joint locks, pressure points and bone displacement techniques for actual fighting encounters that have landed on the ground. The material in this book concentrates on: holding techniques which are capable of immobilizing an opponent with a limited danger of counter-attack, the principles and theory of these holds, the identification and use of pressure points for offensive and defensive purposes.

Over the last twenty-two years as a street policeman (Vancouver, B.C.), I have come to realize the acute deficiencies of Karate as a defensive art, or more practically, as a controlling art; as my chosen vocation demands. For myself, Chin Na was like a snap-on tool, allowing me to adapt my martial arts ability to suit the highly balanced needs of personal self-protection with controlling those I was empowered to arrest. - from the Preface.

  • General history of Chin Na and Ground fighting styles.
  • Positional changes for ground fighting.
  • An introduction to meridian theory.
  • A systematic look at joint locks (arm, legs, neck and body).

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About the Authors

Al Arsenault

It was 1971 when Mr. Arsenault began his martial arts training in North Bay, Ontario under the watchful eye of Sensei Duane Sawyer in Kenshokan Dharma, Goshin Jutsu. At this time, he had yet to hear of Bruce Lee who became a screen idol in the early 70s and started the Kung Fu craze here in North America. He knew about the existence of judo, as it was an Olympic sport. Karate was just a word that he associated to a newly introduced fighting style and kung fu was relatively unheard of. Mr. … More »

Joeseph Faulise

Mr. Faulise has been training and has had an interest in the martial arts since the age of thirteen. He began training in 1973, when he was encouraged by his mother to try out for the wrestling team at school. He learned that the coach also owned a judo school and began training there as well. He did wrestling in the winter months and judo in the summer months until 1977. In 1978 Mr. Faulise started training at a school that emphasized striking and kicking techniques, as well as throwing and … More »