Spoken Chinese Glossary v2 | YMAA
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A spoken (audible) glossary. Chinese Qigong and Internal Arts.

Click on a word below (in the box) to hear it spoken by Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming.

Pinyin is the current standard for Romanizing Chinese characters so they can be read by non-Chinese speaking readers. By adding tonal marks to the Romanized Chinese words (pinyin), we can have a guide for properly pronouncing these words.

Before we can begin learning how to pronounce pinyin words, we must recognize some common differences in how some letters sound.

  • ü Start pronouncing "ee" in English and then round your lips to pronounce "oo".
  • q Pronounced like "ch" in chin.
  • z Pronounced like "ds" in kids.
  • c Pronounced like "ts" in bats.
  • zh Pronounced like "ger" in germ.
  • ch Pronounced like "chur" in church.
  • sh Pronounced like "sur" in sure.
  • er Pronounced like "ar" in are.
  • i When i follows z, c, s, it sounds like "zz": zzz, czz, szz.
  • i When i follows zh, ch, sh, r, it sounds like "rr": zhrr, chrr, shrr, rrr.

There are primarily four tonal categories written in pinyin.

  • 1. mā 妈 (mom). Begins high and stays high.
  • 2. má 麻 (hemp). Begins at mid-range and ends high.
  • 3. mǎ 马 (horse). Begins mid-range, dips low, ends mid-range.
  • 4. mà 骂 (scold). Begins high and ends low.
A


Love, kindness.


Sorrow.


Settle the wrist.


Literally, “Press Rub.” Together they mean massage.


Means “Peace with heaven and delight in your destiny.”


The location of an old Chinese capital during the Shāng dynasty (商朝), 1766-1154 BCE. It has become an important site for archeological study.

B


Eight.


Eight Touches. The physical and sensory phenomena in Qìgōng practice.


Eight Pieces of Brocade. A Wàidān Qìgōng practice said to have been created by Marshal Yuè, Fēi (岳飛) during the Southern Sòng dynasty (南宋), 1127–1279 CE.


Pull the root upward.


Literally, “Eight Divinations.” Also called “the Eight Trigrams.” In Chinese philosophy, the eight basic variations; shown in the Yìjīng (易經) as groups of single and broken lines.


Eight Trigrams Palm. One of the internal Qìgōng martial styles, believed to have been created by Dǒng, Hǎi-Chuān (董海川) between 1866 and 1880 CE.


White.


Means “White Crane.” One of the southern martial arts styles of China.


Literally, “Hundred Meetings.” An important acupuncture cavity located on the top of the head. The Bǎihuì cavity belongs to the Governing Vessel.


“Bǎihuì Breathing Grand Circulation.” Also called “Heaven Gate Breathing” (Tiānménxí, 天門息).


“One Hundred Days of Building the Foundation.” It also means “Refine the Essence and Convert It into Qì” (Liànjīng Huàqì, 煉精化氣).


Referred to as the eight extraordinary vessels. These eight vessels are considered to be Qì reservoirs, which regulate the Qì status in the primary Qì channels.


Eight Doors. The eight basic jìng patterns of tàijíquán that handle eight corners of defense and offense.


Eight Doors and Five Steppings. Eight Doors mean the eight jìngs that are used for defense and offense. Five Steppings means five basic stepping movements in fighting.


Partner.


The name of a well-known Qìgōng and Chinese medical book written by Gé, Hóng (葛洪) during the Jìn dynasty (晉朝) in the 3rd century CE.


A Qìgōng and medical book describing moving and stationary Qìgōng practices. It was written by Cáo, Yuán-Bái (曹元白) during the Qīng dynasty (清朝), 1644–1911 CE..


Embracing the singularity.


Biàn means change. Jiǎodù means angle. Change angle.


A well-known physician who wrote the book, Nànjīng (難經) (Classic on Disorders) during the Chinese Qín and Hàn dynasties (秦,漢), 221 BCE–220 CE.


The stone probes used to press acupuncture cavities for healing before metal needles were available.


“The closed door.” It means that the Mìngmén (Gv-4) (命門) cavity between L2 and L3 has been closed.


Means “Nose Breathing”.


Nourishing.

C


Pluck. One of eight jìng patterns in the tàijíquán Thirteen Postures.


Money.


Pick up earth Qì.


Pluck jìng. The power manifestation of cǎi.


Pick up heaven Qì.


Picked up the little herb. Terminology used in Daoist Qìgōng practice.


Pick up (the Qì) from Yīn to nourish the Yáng.


A well-known physician and Qìgōng master who wrote a book called Bǎoshēn Mìyào (The Secret Important Document of Body Protection, 保身祕要) during the Qīng dynasty (清朝), 1644–1911 CE. The book describes moving and stationary Qìgōng practices.


Sideways neutralization.


A Chinese school of Mahayana Buddhism which asserts that enlightenment can be attained through meditation, self-contemplation and intuition, rather than through study of scripture. Chán is called Zěn in Japan..


Long.


An acupuncture cavity belongs to Governing Vessel. Also known as tailbone (Wěilǘ, 尾閭).


Means “Long Range Fist.” Chángquán includes all northern Chinese long range martial styles. Chángquán has also been used to refer to Tàijíquán.


Long life span.


Coiling jìng.


Chánshǒu means coiling and sticking hands. Liànxí means training or practice.


Silk reeling jing (Chén style). Similar to Yáng style’s yīn-yáng symbol sticking hands.


The Chán school.


“Six Ancestors of Chán” who include Dámó (達摩), Huìkě (慧可), Sēngcàn (僧璨), Dàoxìn (道信), Hóngrěn (弘忍), and Huìnéng (慧能).


“Seven Ancestors of Chán” who include Dámó (達摩), Huìkě (慧可), Sēngcàn (僧璨), Dàoxìn (道信), Hóngrěn (弘忍), Huìnéng (慧能), and Shénhuì (神會).


A well-known physician and Qìgōng master who lived during the Suí and Táng dynasties (隋、唐), 581–907 CE. Cháo, Yuán-Fāng compiled the Zhūbìng Yuánhòu Lùn (Thesis on the Origins and Symptoms of Various Diseases, 諸病源候論), which is a veritable encyclopedia of Qìgōng methods, listing 260 different ways of increasing the Qì flow.


Sink.


A well-known physician and Qìgōng master who wrote the book Yǎngshēng Fūyǔ (養生膚語) (Brief Introduction to Nourishing the Body) during the Qīng dynasty (清朝), 1644–1911 CE. The book is about the three treasures: Jīng (essence), Qì (internal energy), and Shén (spirit).


Dr. Yáng, Jwìng-Mǐng’s White Crane master.


Becoming Buddha; means that Buddhahood is achieved.


Becoming Immortal. Daoist term for Buddhahood.


The energy pervading the universe, including the energy circulating in the human body.


Literally the “Gōngfū of Qì,” which means the study of Qì.


Literally “Grab Control.” A component of Chinese martial arts that emphasizes grabbing techniques to control your opponent’s joints, in conjunction with attacking certain acupuncture cavities.


Thrusting Vessel. One of the eight extraordinary Qì vessels.


“Notorious skin bag.”


Window.


A general traditional definition.


A narrow traditional definition.


Literally, “Touch Feel.” Chùgǎn refers to the unusual feelings or phenomena experienced during Qìgōng practice.


Vertical.


“Open spirit orifice.” It means that the spiritual baby is born and your Third Eye has reopened. You are enlightened.


A Chinese scholar of the period 551–479 BCE, whose philosophy has significantly influenced Chinese culture.


Means to build the foundation of health and longevity internally. That means to regulate the breathing, mind, and Qì internally.


Means to build the physical strength externally.

D


Large or big.


Strike.


Strike tiger posture.


Striking returning jìng. The jìng is manifested in between the end of the opponent’s attack and the retreat of the attack.


Girdle (or Belt) Vessel. One of the eight Qì vessels.


Girdle (Belt) Vessel Breathing.


Large rollback.


Striking the oppressive jìng. The other name of borrowing jìng (jièjìng, 借勁).


The elixir cauldron way of Qìgōng. The Daoists’ Qìgōng training.


Great Bright Heart Mantra.


Dharma’s Muscle/Tendon Changing and Marrow/Brain Washing.


The Indian Buddhist monk credited with creating the Yìjīnjīng (易筋經) and Xǐsuǐjīng (洗髓經) while at the Shàolín monastery. His last name was Sardili and he was also known as Bodhidarma. He was once the prince of a small tribe in southern India.


Codonopsis.


Solo training.


Elixir furnace.


Single hand.


Literally, “Field of Elixir.” Locations in the body which are able to store and generate Qì (elixir) in the body. The Upper, Middle, and Lower Dāntián are located, respectively, between the eyebrows, at the solar plexus, and a few inches below the navel.


Building the foundation of Dāntián.


Usually, the Qì that is converted from Original Essence (Yuánjīng, 元精) and is stored in the Lower Dāntián. This Qì is considered “water Qì” and is able to calm the body. Also called Xiāntiānqì (Pre-Heaven Qì, 先天氣).


Single pushing hand.


Cultivate alone.


The “Way”; by implication the “Natural Way”.


Morality Classic. Written by Lǎozi (老子).


The Dao family. Daoism. Created by Lǎozi (老子) during the Zhōu dynasty (周朝), 1122–934 BCE. In the Hàn dynasty (漢朝)(ca. 58 CE), it was mixed with Buddhism to become the Daoist religion (Dàojiào, 道教).


Daoist religion created by Zhāng, Dào-Líng (張道陵) who combined the traditional Daoist principles with Buddhism during the Chinese Hàn dynasty (漢朝).


Means “Herb picking outside of the Dào.” A special Daoist Qìgōng training method.


One of the six ancestors of Chán.


Traditional scholar Daoism.


Direct and lead.


Large circle.


Large hand stamp. A common Tibetan meditation technique in which some of the meditator’s fingers press against each other.


Literally, “Grand Cycle Heaven.” Usually translated as “Grand Circulation.” After a Nèidān Qìgōng practitioner completes Small Circulation (Xiǎozhōutiān, 小周天), he will circulate his Qì through the entire body or exchange the Qì with nature.


Acupuncture name for a cavity on the Governing Vessel. It means “Big Vertebra”.


Great nature.


Sitting meditation.


Mountain climbing stance. One of the basic stances of the Chinese martial arts.


Place (Dìfāng, 地方).


The Earth. Earth, Heaven (Tiān, 天) and Man (Rén, 人) are the “Three Natural Powers” (Sāncái, 三才).


Fifth gate breathing.


Mài means “The blood vessel” (Xuěmài, 血脈) or “The Qì channel” (Qìmài, 氣脈). Diǎnmài means “To press the blood vessel or Qì channel”.


Diàn means “electricity” and so Diànqì means “electrical energy” (electricity). In China, a word is often placed before “Qì” to identify the different kinds of energy.


Diǎn means “To point and exert pressure” and Xuè means “The cavities.” Diǎnxuè refers to those Qín Ná (擒拿) techniques which specialize in attacking acupuncture cavities to immobilize or kill an opponent.


One of the Chinese massage techniques in which the acupuncture cavities are stimulated through pressing. Diǎnxuè massage is also called acupressure and is the root of Japanese Shiatsu.


Shake.


Hanging groin.


Ground window.


Ground wicket.


Ground Gate Breathing Grand Circulation. Also called “Huìyīn Breathing Grand Circulation” (Huìyīnxí Dàzhōutiān, 會陰息大周天).


Dìlǐ (地理) means geomancy, and Shī (師) means teacher. Therefore, Dìlǐshī is a master who analyzes geographic locations according to the formula in the Yìjīng (易經, The Book of Changes) and the energy distribution in the Earth. Also called Fēngshuǐshī (風水師).


To stabilize and to calm.


Stationary.


To firm the root.


To stabilize the spirit. To keep the spirit at one place (usually the Shàng Dāntián located at the third eye). One of the exercises for regulating the Shén (spirit) in Qìgōng.


Definition.


The Qì or the energy of the earth.


Exchange Qì of human with earth.


Moving.


Understanding.


A well-known Chinese internal martial artist who is credited as the creator of Bāguàzhǎng (八卦掌) in the late Qīng dynasty (清朝), 1644–1911 CE.


Stepping.


Literally, “Moving touch.” Refers to the unusual, automatic movements or feelings sometimes experienced during Qìgōng practice. Also called Chùgǎn (觸感).


Hibernation technique. A Qìgōng technique that trains the hibernation breathing.


Short.


Sparring.


Usually translated “Governing Vessel.” One of the eight extraordinary vessels.


Capture the ball.

E


Name of a mountain in Sichuan Province (四川省), China.


Dàpéng is a kind of large bird that existed in ancient China. Dàpénggōng is a style of Qìgōng that imitates the movements of this bird. This style was developed at Éméi mountain in China.

F


Techniques.


Emitting jìng.


Return. Means to return your breathing to its natural way.


Reverse abdominal breathing. One of the Qìgōng breathing methods. Also called Fǎnhūxī (reverse breathing, 反呼吸) or Daoist breathing.


Injury prevention.


Reverse breathing. Also commonly called “Daoist Breathing.”


Daoist Qìgōng terminology that means “To return the Jīng to nourish the brain.”


Example.


Back to childhood breathing. A breathing training technique in Nèidān Qìgōng (內丹氣功) through which the practitioner tries to regain control of the muscles in the lower abdomen. Also called “abdominal breathing” (Fùhūxī, 腹呼吸).


Return breathing. Means to return your breathing to its natural way.


Wind Pond. An acupuncture cavity belonging to the Gall Bladder Qì channel.


Wind’s Dwelling. An acupuncture cavity on the Governing Vessel (Dūmài, 督脈).


Wind Path. One of the internal Qì circulation paths.


Wind Water. Geomancy. Divination of natural energy relationships in a location, especially the interrelationships of wind and water; hence the name.


Literally, “Wind water teacher.” Teacher or master of geomancy. Geomancy is the art or science of analyzing the natural energy relationships in a location, especially the interrelationships between “wind” and “water,” hence the name. Also called “Dìlǐshī” (地理師).


Crush the Emptiness. The final stage of Daoist Qìgōng enlightenment training.


Literally, “Buddhism family.” Jiào means religion. Therefore, the Buddhist Religion.


Float.


The Bowels. The Yáng organs: the Gall Bladder, Small Intestine, Large Intestine, Stomach, Bladder, and Triple Burner.


According to legend, “The Book of Changes” was first developed by Fú Xī (伏羲) about seven thousand years ago.


Tame the Qì.


Yield Qì methods. Techniques used to calm and tame the Qì.


Literally, “Abdominal way of breathing.” As you breathe, you use the muscles in the lower abdominal area to control the diaphragm. It is also called “back to (the) childhood breathing” (Fǎntóng Hūxī, 返童呼吸).


Skin/Marrow breathing (body breathing). A qìgōng grand circulation practice.


Skin breathing. Also called “body breathing” (Tǐxī, 體息) in Qìgōng practice. A Qìgōng breathing technique in which the Qì is led to the surface of the skin.


Review.

G


Anus.


Literally, “To touch and feel.” In the second stage of relaxation, you are able to physically feel what is going on inside your body. This occurs before the sensing stage.


A famous physician and Qìgōng master who wrote the book Bàopǔzi during the Jìn dynasty (晉) in the 3rd century CE.


The Chinese name of the book A Further Thesis of Complete Study, a medical and Qìgōng thesis written by Zhū, Dān-Xī (朱丹溪) during the Sòng, Jīn, and Yuán dynasties (宋、金、元), 960–1368 CE.


Energy or hard work.


Energy Time. Any study, learning, or practice that requires patience, energy, and time to accomplish. Chinese martial arts require a great deal of time and energy, so they are commonly called Gōngfū.


Bow and arrow stance. One of the basic stances in the Chinese martial arts. It is also called dēngshānbù (登山步).


Arcing arms or hands. A stationary Tàijí Qìgōng training. Also commonly used for greeting.


Resonance centers.


To solidify and to firm.


Look. Implies to feel and to sense.


Joint breathing.


Guan means “To thread together.” Guànqì is a Qìgōng training method in which a practitioner leads Qì from one place to another.


Guān means “To look.” “Look” here means to feel and to sense. Xí is the breathing. Therefore, Guānxí means “To feel and to sense the breathing.”


The Behold and Think Method. A Buddhist technique used to regulate the mind.


Means to inspect or look at the behavior of Xīn (the emotional mind).


Guānyīn Bodhisattva.


Ghost. When you die, if your spirit is strong, your soul’s energy will not decompose and return to nature. This soul energy is a ghost.


Turtle Shell Breathing.


Ghost Qì. The Qì residue of a dead person. It is believed by the Chinese Buddhists and Daoists that this Qì residue is a so-called ghost.


Turtle breathing. In Chinese Qìgōng society, it is believed that a turtle is able to live for a long time because it knows how to breath through its skin. Therefore, skin breathing in Qìgōng is called turtle breathing.


To make solid, to firm the essence”; it means to firm Original Jīng.


Abbreviation of “Zhōngguó Wǔshù” (中國武術), which means “Chinese Martial Techniques.”


Means “To firm and solidify.” An exercise for regulating the Shén in which you firm and strengthen the spirit at its residence.


Means “To firm and solidify the kidneys.” A method to strengthen the kidneys; therefore, to prevent the loss of the Original Essence.


The Valley Spirit.


Bone Marrow.


Bone Marrow Washing.

H


Laughing sound. A Qìgōng sound commonly used to lead an over-abundance of Qì from inside the body out and therefore reduce over-accumulated Qì. In martial arts, this sound is also used to manifest power.


Sea Bottom. Martial arts name for the Huìyīn (Co-1, 會陰), or perineum.


A well-known Chinese martial artist, especially in Táiwān in the last forty years. Master Hán is also Dr. Yáng, Jwìng-Mǐng’s Long Fist Grand Master.


A dynasty from Chinese history, 206 BCE–221 CE.


Han’s Book of Art and Literature, by Bāngù (班固) during the Chinese East-Hàn Dynasty (25–220 CE).


Harmony or peace.


Black.


Hate.


Sad sound. A Yīn Qìgōng sound that is the opposite of the Hā Yáng sound. In martial arts, this sound is used to store power.


Red.


One of the six ancestors of Chan.


Post-Birth Qì or Post-Heaven Qì. This Qì is converted from the essence of food and air and is classified as “Fire Qì” because it can make your body too Yáng.


Neutralize.


Slippery.


Embracing the moon on the chest. Name of a form of qìgōng practice.


Slow.


Change directions or change side.


Yellow.


The Yellow Emperor (2690–2590 BCE).


Plain Questions: Yellow Emperor’s Internal Canon of Medicine, by Líng Shū (靈樞) (Miraculous Pivot); composed during Chinese Hàn Dynasty (circa 100–300 BCE).


Astragali Radix.


Yellow yard. A special Daoist term that means guts (i.e., the second brain). 1. A yard or hall in which Daoists, who often wore yellow robes, meditate together. 2. In Qìgōng training, a spot in the abdomen where it is believed that you are able to generate an “embryo.”


Literally, “To return the essence to nourish the brain.” A Daoist Qìgōng training process in which Qì that is converted from essence is led to the brain to nourish it.


Exchange Qì technique.


Flower fist and brocade leg. Implies that the martial arts performed are not powerful and cannot be used in a real fight.


A well-known Chinese physician who lived during the Jìn dynasty (晉) in the 3rd century CE.


A province in China.


Tiger Step Gōng. A style of Qìgōng training.


One of the six ancestors of Chán Buddhism.


One of the six ancestors of Chán Buddhism.


“Meet Yīn.” The perineum, an acupuncture cavity on the Conception Vessel. It is also called “Sea Bottom” (Hǎidǐ, 海底).


Huìyīn Breathing Grand Circulation. Also called Ground Gate Breathing Grand Circulation (Dìhùxí, 地戶息).


The Soul. Commonly used with the word Líng (靈), which means spirit. Daoists believe one’s Hún (魂) and Pò (魄) originate with his Original Qì (Yuánqì, 元氣) and separate from the physical body at death.


Mix together.


Fire.


Alive stepping.


Fire Dragon Gōng. A style of Qìgōng training created by Tàiyáng martial stylists (太陽宗).


Fire Path. The regular path of Small Circulation that follows the natural Qì circulation of the body.


Huo means “Alive.” Huóqì is the Qì of a living person or animal.


Fire Qì. Also called “Post-Birth Qì.” Qì which tends to make the body positive, or Yáng.


Tiger claw. A style of Chinese martial arts.

J


Squeeze or press.


False Lower Dāntián. Called Qìhǎi (Co-6, 氣海) (Qì sea) in Chinese medicine. Daoists believe that the Lower Dāntián in front of the abdomen is not the Real Dāntián.


The False Look. A technique to regulate the mind in Buddhist meditation.


Oracle-Bone Scripture. It is the earliest evidence of the Chinese use of the written word. Found on pieces of turtle shell and animal bone from the Shāng dynasty (商朝), 1766-1154 BCE. Most of the information recorded was of a religious nature.


Hard and strong.


To maintain a healthy physical body.


Means “To see Nature and understand what it really is.”


Focal points.


Sense of angling.


Beggar Gōng. A style of Qìgōng training.


Basic jìngs.


Foundation.


To join, to connect, or to graft.


Borrowing jìng. Borrowing jìng is known as the ability to sense an opponent’s attacking jìng and borrow the energy before it was manifested.


Introduction.


Explanation.


Liberate yourself from spiritual bondage.


Huìkě’s layman name. Huìkě is one of the six ancestors of Chán Buddhism.


Press and neutralize.


Squeeze or press jìng.


Metal.


Muscles and tendons.


Dr. Yáng, Jwìng-Mǐng’s White Crane grand master.


Golden Elixir Large Way. A special Daoist Nèidān Qìgōng training.


The martial power in Chinese martial arts that derives from muscles that have been energized by Qì to their maximum potential.


Clean. Means “regulated.”


Essence. The most refined part of anything. What is left after something has been refined and purified. In Chinese medicine, Jīng can mean semen, but it generally refers to the basic substance of the body enlivened by the Qì and Shén (spirit).


Channels. Sometimes translated as “Meridians.” Refers to the twelve organ-related “rivers” that circulate Qì throughout the body.


Classic or bible.


Calm and silent.


Gōngfū of jìng’s manifestation.


Awareness.


Martial power.


Means “To refine or purify a liquid to a high quality.”


Means “Excellent Quality” (literally “Pure and good”).


Essence Doors. They are located on the back of the body.


“Keen and clever”; when someone is smart or wise, he or she is called “Jīngmíng.”


Means “Qì Scenery” or “Qì View.”


Essence Qì or semen Qì, converted from Original Essence (Yuánjīng, 元精).


Meridian Qìgōng.


Literally “Essence Shén,” which is commonly translated as “spirit of vitality.”


Alertness.


The name of a Chinese book, Prescriptions from the Golden Chamber, that discusses the use of breathing and acupuncture to maintain good Qì flow. This book was written by Zhāng, Zhòng-Jǐng during the Qín and Hàn dynasties, 221 BCE–220 CE.


Clean. Means “regulated.” Xí means “breathing.” Therefore, Jìngxí means to use natural breathing to regulate your thoughts.


Means “Delicate and painstaking” (literally, “pure and fine”).


Literally, “Essence Son.” The most refined part of human essence. The sperm.


To sit quietly in meditation; means sitting meditation.


Literally, “Golden bell cover.” A higher level of Iron Shirt training.


Wide Pigeon’s Tail. An acupuncture cavity at the lower sternum on the Conception Vessel. Called Xīnkǎn (心坎) (i.e., Heart Pit) by martial society.


Absolute Yīn. Terminology used in acupuncture.


Sense of distance.


“Gathering your Jīng to meet your Shén”; implies that your mind is concentrating on doing something.


A Daoist and Chinese doctor who lived during the Jìn dynasty (晉), 265–420 CE. Jūnqiàn is credited as the creator of the Five Animal Sports Qìgōng practice.

K


Open the crux or tricky gate.


In the Eight Trigrams, Kǎn represents “water” while Lí represents “fire.”


Bump.


Dr. Yáng, Jwìng-Mǐng’s first Tàijíquán master.


Scientific foundation.


The Empty Look. One of the methods of regulating the mind in Qìgōng meditation.


Empty door. The door that allows you to attack.


Air.


Hip joint area.


Means “Energy” or “Hard Work.”


Literally, “Energy-Time.” Any study, learning, or practice that requires patience, energy, and time to complete. Since practicing Chinese martial arts requires a great deal of time and energy, Chinese martial arts are commonly called “Gōngfū.”


Literally, “National Techniques.” Another name for Chinese martial arts. First used by President Chiang, Kai-Shek (蔣介石) in 1926 at the founding of the Nanking Central Guóshù Institute (南京中央國術館).

L


A Tibetan monk. Also used for Tibetan White Crane style.


Grasp Sparrows Tail. Name of a tàijíquán posture.


Secret Library of the Orchid Room. The name of a Chinese medical and Qìgōng book written by Lǐ, Guǒ (李果) during the Sòng, Jīn, and Yuán dynasties (宋、金、元), 960–1368 CE.


Labor’s palace. Name of an acupuncture cavity, located at the center of the palms and belonging to the pericardium primary qì channel (xīn bāoluòjīng, 心包絡經).


Laogong breathing. A gland qì circulation qìgōng practice.


The creator of Daoism, also called Lǐěr.


Joy or happiness.


Cold.


In the Eight Trigrams, Kǎn represents “water” while Lí represents “fire.”


A well-known Chinese physician and Qìgōng master who wrote a book, Lánshì Mìcáng (Secret Library of the Orchid Room, 蘭室祕藏) during the Sòng, Jīn, and Yuán dynasties (宋、金、元), 960–1368 CE.


Dr. Yáng, Jwìng-Mǐng’s Long Fist master.


A well-known Chinese physician and Qìgōng master who wrote a book about the eight Qì vessels, Qíjīng Bāmài Kǎo (Deep Study of the Extraordinary Eight Vessels, 奇經八脈考) in the 16th century.


A famous tàijíquán master during the Qīng Dynasty (AD 1644–1911) (清朝).


To refine, to train, or to discipline.


Cool.


A dynasty in Chinese history, 502–557 CE.


Linking jìng. Jìng is manifested continuously.


To refine the essence and convert it into Qì. One of the Qìgōng training processes through which you convert essence into Qì. It is the practice of “One Hundred Days of Building the Foundation” (Bǎirì Zhújī, 百日築基).


Training the Qì.


To refine the Qì to nourish the spirit. Part of the Qìgōng training process in which you learn how to lead Qì to the head to nourish the brain and Shén (spirit). It is the practice of “Ten Months of Pregnancy” (Shíyuè Huáitāi, 十月懷胎).


To train Qì and sublimate it. Xǐsuǐjīng (洗髓經) training to lead Qì to the Huángtíng (黃庭) or the brain.


To train the Shén (i.e., spirit). To refine, strengthen, and focus the Shén.


To train the body.


To train the spirit to return to nothingness, to attain freedom from emotional bondage. An advanced stage of enlightenment and Buddhahood training to lead the spirit to separate from the body. It is called “Three Years of Nursing” (Sānnián Bǔrǔ, 三年哺乳).


To refine the spirit and end human nature. This is the final stage of spiritual Qìgōng training for enlightenment. In this process you learn to keep your emotions neutral and try to be undisturbed by human nature.


Practice or train.


Split.


Split jìng.


Nickname of Lǎozi, the creator of scholarly Daoism.


To comprehend.


Theory.


The spirit of being, which acts upon others. Líng only exists in high spiritual animals such as humans and monkeys. It represents an emotional comprehension and understanding. When you are alive, it implies your intelligence and wisdom. When you die, it implies the spirit of the ghost. Líng also means “divine” or “supernatural.” Líng is often used together with Shén (Língshén, 靈神) to mean “supernatural spirit.” It is believed that Qì is the source that nourishes the Líng and is called “Língqì” (靈氣), “meaning “supernatural energy, power, or force.”


Spiritual Treasure to Reach the End Method. A Tibetan Qìgōng training technique.


Spiritual ghost.


Spiritual soul.


Supernatural Shén or divine.


Spiritual Platform. An acupuncture cavity on the Governing Vessel. Called Jiájí (夾脊) (Squeeze the Spine) by Daoists and Mìngmén (命門) (Life Door) by martial arts society.


Spiritual baby or embryo.


Língzhī (Fomes Japonica) is a hard, dark brownish fungus which is supposed to possess supernatural powers. In Qìgōng society, sometimes Língzhī means the elixir that enables you to have a long life.


Strength.


Six bows, meaning four limbs (four bows), spine, and chest that can be used to store power for manifestation.


Literally, “Six combinations eight methods.” One of the internal martial arts of China, its techniques are combined from Tàijíquán (太極拳), Xíngyìquán (形意拳) and Bāguàzhǎng (八卦掌). This internal martial art was reportedly created by Chén, Bó (陳博) during the Sòng dynasty (宋朝), 960–1279 CE.


Six Qìgōng Verifications. These are: A. Dāntián is hot as if it were on fire; B. The (internal) kidneys feel like they are boiling in water; C. The eyes are emitting a beam of light; D. Winds are being generated behind the ears; E. An eagle is shouting behind your head; F. Your body is energized and your nose trembles.


Six turning secrets.


Groin. A miscellaneous acupuncture cavity.


Dragon shape. A style of Chinese martial arts.


Rollback.


Green.


Rollback/press.


Confucius’ Analects.


Countless secondary channels (i.e., streams) branched out from meridians (i.e., rivers) that allow the Qì to reach the skin and the bone marrow.


Spiraling jìng.

M


Horse Stance. One of the basic stances in Chinese martial arts.


Vessel or Qì channel. The eight vessels (Bāmài, 八脈) involved with transporting, storing, and regulating Qì.


A well-known scholar who followed the philosophy of Confucius during the Chinese Zhōu dynasty (周朝), 909–255 BCE.


Soft.


Immunity.


Physical life.


A Chinese dynasty from 1368 to 1644 CE.


Life Door. An acupuncture cavity that belongs to the Governing Vessel (Dūmài, 督脈) located between L2 and L3 vertebrae. It is also called “Bìhù” (閉戶) and means “the closed door.”


To beat the heavenly drum. A Qìgōng practice for waking up and clearing the mind in which the back of the head is tapped with the fingers.


Literally, “Secret Style of Spiritual Gōngfū.” This means Tibetan Qìgōng and martial arts, originally passed down secretly.


Secret Style. Tibetan Qìgōng is commonly called “Mìzōng” simply because it is not known by outsiders.


Wood.


Unification or mutual harmonization of mother and son. The final stage of Embryonic Breathing in that the spirit (i.e., son) and the Qì (i.e., mother) are united at the Real Lower Dāntián.

N


This means qínná (擒拿), which means to seize and control.


Endurance.


Controlling jìng.


A book written by the Daoist philoso¬pher Zhuāngzi (莊子) circa 300 BCE. This book describes the relationship between health and the breath.


Classic on Disorders. A medical book written by the famous physician Biǎnquè (扁鵲) during the Qín and Hàn dynasties (秦、漢), 221 BCE–220 CE. Nànjīng describes the methods of using breathing to increase Qì circulation.


Brain’s Household. An acupuncture cavity on the Governing Vessel. Also called Jade Pillow (Yùzhěn, 玉枕) by Daoist society.


Refers to the brain, including limbic system, cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla oblongata.


The pituitary gland.


Literally, “Internal elixir.” A form of Qìgōng in which Qì (the elixir) is built up in the body and led out to the limbs.


Internal elixir Qìgōng or Gōngfū.


Internal Gōngfū. All training in which the mind leads the circulation of Qì, either for manifestation or enlightenment.


Illustrated Explanation of Nèigōng. The name of the Qìgōng book written by Wáng, Zǔ-Yuán (王祖源) during the Qīng dynasty (清朝). This book presents the Twelve Pieces of Brocade and explains the idea of combining both moving and stationary Qìgōng.


Contents.


A chapter of the book Huángdì Nèijīng Sùwèn (Plain Questions: Yellow Emperor’s Internal Canon of Medicine, 黃帝內經素問) (Hàn Dynasty, circa 100–300 BCE) by Líng Shū (靈樞) (Miraculous Pivot).


Internal kuà. Kuà means the waist and hip joints area.


Internal Qì. The bioelecticity circulation in the body is considered internal Qì.


Literally, “internal kidneys.” In Chinese medicine and Qìgōng, the real Kidneys; Wàishèn (external kidneys, 外腎) refers to the testicles.


Means “To see internally and to listen inwardly.”


Nèishì means “To look internally,” so Nèishì gōngfū refers to the art of looking inside yourself to read the state of your health and the condition of your Qì.


Reverse Abdominal Breathing. Also called Fǎn fùhūxī (反腹呼吸) or Daoist Breathing (Dàojiā hūxī, 道家呼吸).


Thoughts that stay with you and do not go away.


To concentrate, to condense, to refine, to focus, and to strengthen.


To condense or focus on the spirit. In Qìgōng training, after you are able to keep your spirit in one place, you learn how to condense it into a tiny spot and make it stronger.


Twisting.


Twisting jìng.


Mud Pill Palace. Located at the center of your head. The limbic system.


Anger.


Warm.

P


Style or division.


Wardoff.


Wardoff jìng.


Péng, Zǔ was a legendary Qìgōng practitioner during the period of Emperor Yáo (堯) (2356–2255 BCE), who was said to have lived for eight hundred years.


Pénglái Immortal Island (Pénglái Xiāndǎo, 蓬萊仙島). An island in the East Sea where the immortals resided, according to Chinese legend.


Peace and harmony.


Balance.


Vigorous life force. The Pò is considered to be the inferior or animal soul. It is the animal or sentient life that is an innate part of the body which, at death, returns to the earth with the rest of the body. When someone is in high spirits and gets vigorously involved in some activity it is said he has Pòlì (魄力), which means he has “vigorous strength or power.”

Q


Odd, strange, or mysterious.


The general definition of Qì is: universal energy, including heat, light, and electromagnetic energy. A narrower definition of Qì refers to the energy circulating in human or animal bodies. A current popular model is that the Qì circulating in the human body is bioelectric in nature.


Qì massage. One of the high levels of massage techniques in which a massage doctor uses his own Qì to remove Qì stagnation in the patient’s body. Also called Wàiqì Liáofǎ (外氣療法), which means healing with external Qì.


Literally, “Qì blood.” According to Chinese medicine, Qì and blood cannot be separated in our bodies and so the two words are commonly used together.


Occupy empty door.


Occupy central door.


Between Strength. An acupuncture cavity on the Governing Vessel. This and the Third Eye are located at the exit point of the Spiritual Valley (Shéngǔ, 神谷).


Strengthen the kidneys.


To condition the physical body (include internal organs).


Forward and backward movement. Means rocking.


Thousand Gold Prescriptions. A medical book written by the well know physician Sūn, Sī-Miǎo (孫思邈) during the Suí and Táng dynasties (隋、唐), 581–907 CE. This book describes the method of leading Qì, and also describes the use of the Six Sounds.


The subconscious mind.


Means “knack gate.” Huìyīn (會陰) is called “Qiàomén” since it is the crucial gate to manipulate Qì function in the body.


The Qì reservoirs; means Eight vessels (Bāmài, 八脈).


Qì field cavity.


Sink the Qì to Dāntián.


Gōng means Gōngfū (功夫)(literally “Energy-time.”) Therefore, Qìgōng means study, research, and/or practices related to Qì.


Qìgōng massage.


Organ’s breathing.


Sea of Qì. Qì Ocean. An acupuncture cavity on the Conception Vessel, about two inches below the navel.


Theory of Qì’s Variation by Zhuāngzi (莊子) (370–369 BCE).


To start the fire. To build up Qì at the Lower Dāntián (Xià Dāntián, 下丹田).


Qì knot; means the stagnation or blockage of Qì’s circulation.


Literally, “Strange (odd) channels eight vessels.” Usually referred to as the eight extraordinary vessels or simply as the vessels. Called odd or strange because they are not well understood and some of them do not exist in pairs.


Deep Study of the Extraordinary Eight Vessels. A book written by Lǐ, Shí-Zhēn (李時珍).


Qì vessels. The eight vessels involved with transporting, storing, and regulating Qì.


Expectation’s door. Name of an acupuncture cavity that belongs to the liver channel.


A Chinese dynasty from 255-206 BCE.


The last of China’s dynasties, from 1644–1912 CE.


Peaceful Cultivation Division. A branch of Daoist Qìgōng.


Clear, clean, and peaceful.


Light, as in weight.


Blue color.


Qīngchén Mountain, located in Sìchuān province (四川省).


Peaceful Cultivation Division. A division of Daoist Qìgōng training that is similar to Buddhism.


Literally “Grab control.” A component of Chinese martial arts that emphasizes grabbing techniques to control your opponent’s joints, in conjunction with attacking certain acupuncture cavities.


To seize the ape and catch the horse. A common name for the practice of regulating the mind in Chinese Qìgōng society. The ape represents the emotional mind and the horse represents the calm wisdom mind. In regulating the mind training, you must be able to control your emotional mind and make your wisdom mind steady.


Seven emotions and six desires. The seven emotions are happiness, anger, sorrow, joy, love, hate and desire. The six desires are the six sensory pleasures associated with the eyes, nose, ears, tongue, body and mind.


“Qì dwelling,” located at the center of the gut.


Shì means the way something looks or feels. Therefore, the feeling of Qì as it expresses itself.


Qì breathing.


Qì cavities.


Qì Blood. According to Chinese medicine, Qì and blood cannot be separated, and the two words are commonly used together.


Central Qì system (i.e., central nervous system; spinal cord).

R


Yield.


Hot.


Man or mankind.


Humanity, kindness or benevolence.


Means “To endure.” The Japanese name of Chan.


Conception Vessel. One of the eight vessels (Bāmài, 八脈).


Human Qì.


Ginseng.


Literally, “Human relations.” Human events, activities and relationships.


Philtrum. An acupuncture cavity on the Governing Vessel (Dūmài, 督脈). Also called Shuǐgōu (水溝), meaning water ditch.


Means “warmth” or “heat.” Generally, Rèqì is used to represent heat. It implies that a person or animal is still alive because the body is warm.


Soft Qìgōng.


Soft.


Literally, “Confucian family.” Scholars following Confucian thoughts; Confucianists.


A book written by Zhāng, Zi-Hé (張子和) during the Sòng, Jīn, and Yuán dynasties (宋、金、元), 960–1368 CE.

S


Three Treasures, meaning Jīng (essence, 精), Qì (energy, 氣), and Shén (spirit, 神). Also called Sānyuán (三元, three origins) or (Sānběn, 三本).


Three Foundations. Also called Sānyuán (三元) (three origins) or (Sānbǎo, 三寶) (three treasures).


Three Powers. The Three Powers are Heaven (Tiān, 天), Earth (Dì, 地), and Man (Rén, 人).


Three power posture. A standing meditation posture of tàijíquán qígōng.


Energy dispersion. Premature degeneration of the body where Qì cannot effectively energize it. Generally caused by excessive training. A known problem for those who overtrain hard Gōngfū.


Three gates or three obstacles of Small Circulation meditation. They are Wěilǘ (尾閭), Jiājí (夾脊), and Yùzhěn (玉枕).


Three lights. In Chinese Qìgōng it is said that the Liver has the Hún (soul, 魂) light, which shows in the eyes; the Lungs have Pò (vigorous life force, 魄) light, which shows in the nose; and the Kidneys have the Jīng (Essence, 精) light, which show in the ears.


Three flowers reach the top. One of the final goals of Qìgōng whereby the three treasures (essence, Qì, and Shén) are led to the top of the body to nourish the brain and spirit center (Upper Dāntián).


Triple burner. In Chinese medicine, the body is divided into three sections: the upper burner (chest), the middle burner (stomach area), and the lower burner (lower abdomen).


Three Years of Nursing. The training of “Refining Shén and return it to Nothingness” (Liànshén Fǎnxū, 煉神返虛).


Three sections of the body. The entire body can be divided into three sections: from the knees down, from the knees to xīnkǎn (心坎) (jiūwěi, Co-15) (鳩尾), and from xinkan to the crown.


The three sounds.


Tàijí fighting set.


Three Yīn Junctions. An acupuncture cavity on the spleen channel. The junction of the three Yīn channels, namely spleen, liver, and kidneys.


Three origins. Also called “Sānbǎo” (Three treasures, 三寶). Human Essence (Jīng), energy (Qì) and spirit (Shén).


Harsh.


Monk soldiers. Shaolin martial monks.


One of the six Chán ancestors.


Sand bag.


Upper Dāntián, the center of the brain, which connects to the lower center of the forehead (or the Third Eye). In fact, often the entire brain is considered to be the Upper Dāntián.


A Chinese dynasty from 1766–1154 BCE.


Upward neutralization.


Means the body is “on fire.” This means the Qì is too sufficient in the body which makes the body on fire (i.e., too positive).


Upper Burner. One of the Triple Burners in Chinese medicine. The Upper Burner covers the area between the throat and the solar plexus.


The central area between the nipples. Some Qìgōng practitioners consider Shanzhong to be the Middle Dan Tian. Its acupuncture name is Penetrating Odor.


Lesser sea. Name of an acupuncture cavity that belongs to the heart channel.


Young woods. Name of the Shàolín Temple.


Shàolín Temple. A Buddhist temple in Hénán province (河南省), famous for its martial arts.


Lesser Yáng. Terminology used in Chinese acupuncture.


Lesser Yīn. Terminology used in Chinese acupuncture.


Set up an angle.


Absorb the essence.


Deep.


Spirit. According to Chinese Qìgōng, the Shén resides at the Upper Dāntián (the third eye).


The spirit is not kept at its residence. This implies not being able to concentrate, or a scattered mind.


Means “the door of life” and implies Yīnjiāo (Co-7, 陰交) or navel.


Life.


To build a foundation of life.


Holy embryo. Another name for the spiritual embryo (Shéntāi, 神胎).


The Spiritual Valley. Formed by the two hemispheres of the brain, with the Upper Dāntián (i.e., The Third Eye) at the exit point.


One of the Seven Ancestors of Chán. Shénhuì was recognized and became as seventh ancestor during the Táng dynasty of Kāiyuán, 713–742 CE.


Refers to the spirit of a dying person since his spirit is between “Shén” and “Hún.”


Spiritual communication.


Spiritually divine or enlightened beings.


Mutual harmony or unification of spirit and Qì. The final regulating of spirit.


Shén dwelling. The Limbic System at the center of your head is where the spirit resides. It is also called “Mud Pill Palace” (Níwángōng, 泥丸宮).


An acupuncture cavity belonging to the Bladder Qì Channel.


Kidneys’ water.


Spiritual embryo.


Spirit’s Hall. An acupuncture cavity that belongs to the Governing Vessel (Dūmài, 督脈).


Spiritual enlightenment or spiritual communication. It means that one has reopened “The Third Eye” and has the capability for spiritual communication with natural spirit.


Spiritual enlightenment grand circulation.


Spirit breathing. The stage of Qìgōng training where the spirit is coordinated with the breathing.


The Shén and breathing mutually rely on each other. A stage in Qìgōng practice.


Means “Immortal.”


Body and heart (mind) balanced. The balance of the physical body and mental body.


The mind generates the will, which keeps the Shén firm. The Chinese commonly use Shén (spirit) and Zhì (will) together because they are so related.


Means “The spirit and the will (generated from Yì) are not clear.” The mind is confused and not steady.


Snake shape. A style of Chinese martial arts.


The Twelve Primary Qì Channels (Meridians) in Chinese medicine.


Twelve Postures. A style of Qìgōng practice created during the Qīng dynasty (清朝).


Historical Record. A book written in the Spring and Autumn and Warring States periods (Chūnqiū Zhànguó, 春秋戰國), 770–221 BCE.


Literally, “Sakyamuni family.” Since Buddhism was created by Sakyamuni, it means Buddhism.


Food Qì. Qì converted from food.


Thirteen Postures, foundation of tàijíquán.


Ten Months of Pregnancy. The training of “Purify Qì and convert it into Shén” (Liànqì huàshén, 練氣化神).


To keep and to protect.


To keep the mind at the spirit. A Qìgōng meditation training.


Count.


Wrestling.


Two-person practice together.


Two hands.


Double push jìng.


Double pushing hands.


Dual cultivation. A Qìgōng training method in which Qì is exchanged with a partner to balance the Qì of both. It also means dual cultivation of the body and the spirit.


Water.


Water Path. One Qì path in which Qì is led up through the Thrusting Vessel (Chōngmài, 衝脈) to the brain for nourishment. It can calm down the excitement of your body. It is also the path of the cultivation of spiritual enlightenment.


Horizontal.


Horizontal neutralization.


Water Qì. It is also called “Pre-Birth Qì” that is able to cool down the Post-Birth Qì (Hòutiānqì, 後天氣), which is called “Fire Qì” (Huǒqì, 火氣).


Combing the hair.


Count the breaths.


Four large are empty. A stage of Buddhism where all of the four elements (earth, water, fire, and air) are absent from the mind so that one is completely indifferent to worldly temptations.


Four-six stance. One of the basic stances in Chinese martial arts.


Dead Qì. The Qì remaining in a dead body. Sometimes called “Ghost Qì” (Guǐqì, 鬼氣).


Four Gates Breathing. A martial arts grand circulation practice.


A dynasty in Chinese history from 960–1279 CE.


The pineal gland.


Loosen up the hip area.


Sōng Mountain.


Loosen and relax the body.


Loosen up the waist area.


Literally, “Calculate life teacher.” A fortune teller who is able to calculate your future and destiny.


Follow.


Includes “Gǔsuǐ” (骨髓), which means “bone marrow,” and “Nǎosuǐ” (腦髓), which refers to the brain, including the limbic system, cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla oblongata.


A dynasty in China during the period of 581–618 CE.


Following jìng.


Marrow qì.


To follow the breathing. A technique for regulating the mind.


Suí means the marrow or brain. Therefore, Suíxí means the Qìgōng breathing technique which is able to lead the Qì to the bone marrow and brain.


A well-known Chinese physician and Qìgōng master who wrote the book Qiānjīnfāng (Thousand Gold Prescriptions, 千金方) during the Sui and Tang dynasties, 581–907 CE.


A medical book. The complete name of the book is Huángdì Nèijīng Sùwèn (The Yellow Emperor’s Classic, 黃帝內經素問). This book was written during the Hàn dynasty, circa 100–300 BCE.

T


A Chinese internal martial style based on the theory of Tàijí (Grand Ultimate).


Means “Grand Ultimate.” It is this force that generates two poles, Yīn and Yáng.


Tàijí power manifestation.


Qìgōng practice for Tàijíquán practitioners.


Tàijí ball qìgōng.


Tàijí pushing hands.


Tàijí yīn-yáng symbol circle.


A Chinese internal martial style which is based on the theory of Tàijí (Grand Ultimate).


Old Lord of the Ultimate. The religious title of Lǎozi (老子) by religious Daoists.


Embryonic breathing. One of the final goals in regulating the breath, Embryo Breathing enables you to generate a “baby Shén” at the Huángtíng (yellow yard, 黃庭).


Greater Yáng. A special terminology used in acupuncture.


A school of Chinese martial arts that practices Huǒlónggōng (Fire Dragon Gōng, 火龍功) Qìgōng training.


Greater Yīn. A special terminology used in acupuncture.


A style of Chinese external martial arts.


A dynasty in Chinese history from 618-907 CE.


Iron the Eyes. A Qìgōng practice that keeps the eyes in a healthy condition.


A well-known physician and Qìgōng master who compiled the book Yǎngxìng Yánmìng Lù (Records of Cultivating Temperament and Extending Life, 養性延命錄) between 420 to 581 CE.


Kicking.


Heaven or sky. One of the “Three Powers” (Sāncái, 三才). In ancient China, people believed heaven to be the most powerful force in the universe.


Sky window.


Heaven’s well. One of the acupuncture cavities. It belongs to the triple burner channel (sānjiāo, 三焦).


Heaven Gate.


Heaven/Ground Gates Nourishing Brain Breathing.


Heaven/Ground Gates Nourishing Qì Breathing.


Heaven/Ground Gates Cleansing Body Breathing.


Heaven/Ground Gates Two Poles Breathing.


Heaven/Ground Gates Raise Up Spirit Breathing.


Heaven/Ground Gates Grand Circulation.


Heaven Gate Breathing. Also called Bǎihuì Breathing Grand Circulation (Bǎihuì Xī Dàzhōutiān, 百會息大周天).


Heaven Gate Breathing Grand Circulation.


Heaven Eye; means the “Third Eye.” The Chinese believe that prior to our evolution into humans, our race possessed an additional sense organ in our forehead. This third eye provided a means of spiritual communication between one another and with the natural world. As we evolved and developed means to protect ourselves from the environment, and as societies became more complex and human vices developed, this Third Eye gradually closed and disappeared.


Heaven Qì. It is now commonly used to mean the weather, since weather is governed by Heaven Qì.


Literally, “Heaven and man unified as one.” A high level of Qìgōng practice in which a Qìgōng practitioner, through meditation, is able to communicate his Qì with heaven’s Qì.


Human and heaven (i.e., nature) exchange Qì with each other.


Heavenly timing. The repeated natural cycles generated by the heavens, such as seasons, months, days, and hours.


Heaven’s Prominence. An acupuncture cavity on the Conception Vessel (Dūmài, 督脈). This cavity connects with the Dàzhuī cavity (Gv-14, 大椎) on the back, and they are regarded as a pair of corresponding cavities.


Literally, “Heaven Eye”; means the “Third Eye.” Called Yìntáng (M-HN-3, 印堂) in acupuncture.


Translates as “regulating.” Tiáo (調) is constructed of two words: Yán (言), which means “speaking” or “negotiating,” and Zhōu (周), which means “to be complete,” “to be perfect,” or “to be round.” A gradual regulating process, resulting in that which is regulated achieving harmony with others.


Regulating without regulating.


To regulate the essence.


To regulate the Qì.


To regulate the spirit.


To regulate the body.


To regulate the breathing.


To regulate the emotional mind.


Iron shirt. Gōngfū training that toughens the body externally and internally.


Literally, “Iron sand palm.” A special martial arts conditioning for the palms.


Listen.


Listening jìng.


To Listen to the Breathing. A technique for regulating the mind. If you are able to pay attention to your breathing, your mind will not be distracted by surrounding activities.


Raise up spirit.


Body breathing. Also called “skin breathing” (Fūxī, 膚息) in Qìgōng practice. This Qìgōng breathing technique enables you to lead Qì to the skin surface, to strengthen Guardian Qì (Wèiqì, 衛氣).


To Comprehend the Real and Stop Method. One of the methods used to regulate the mind in Qìgōng meditation.


Same side.


To pass through the gates. In Qìgōng training, the opening of blockages (gates) that hinder the free flow of Qì through the channels.


Illustration of the Brass Man Acupuncture and Moxibustion. An acupuncture book written by Dr. Wáng, Wéi-Yī (王唯一) during the Sòng dynasty (宋朝).


Means “To get through the three gates.” A special terminology used in Small Circulation.


Earth.


Push and pull.


Means “To push and grab.” A category of Chinese massages for healing and injury treatment.


Qìgōng is commonly called Tǔnà, which means “to utter and admit.” This implies uttering and admitting the air through the nose in respiration.

W


External elixir. External Qìgōng exercises in which a practitioner will build up the Qì in his limbs and then lead it into the center of the body for nourishment.


External Elixir Qìgōng or Gōngfū.


The external hip joint area.


External Qì. Air Qì is considered to be external Qì.


External Qì healing. A high level of Qì massage in which you use your own Qì to remove Qì stagnation in the patient.


Chinese define the kidneys as internal kidneys and external kidneys. Internal kidneys (Nèishèn, 內腎) are the kidneys defined by Western medicine. External kidneys are the testicles or ovaries.


The Extra Important Secret. A Chinese medical book written by Wang Tao during the Sui and Tang dynasties, 581–907 CE. This book discusses the use of breathing and herbal therapies for disorders of Qì circulation.


A well-known Chinese physician who wrote the book Yīfāng Jíjiě (The Total Introduction to Medical Prescriptions, 醫方集解) during the Qīng dynasty.


A well-known Chinese physician and Qìgōng master who wrote the book Wàitái Mìyào (The Extra Important Secret, 外台祕要) during the Suí and Táng dynasties (隋、唐), 581–907 CE.


A well-known Chinese physician who wrote the book Tóngrén Yúxuè Zhēnjiǔ Tú (Illustration of the Brass Man Acupuncture and Moxibustion, 銅人俞穴鍼灸圖) during the Sòng dynasty (宋朝).


A famous tàijíquán master during the Qīng Dynasty (AD 1644–1911) (清朝).


A well-known Chinese physician who wrote the book Nèigōng Túshuō (Illustrated Explanation of Nèigōng, 內功圖說) during the Qīng dynasty (清朝).


A well-known physician who wrote the book Zhōuyì Cāntóngqì (A comparative study of the Zhōu dynasty Book of Changes, 周易參同契) during the Qín and Hàn dynasties (秦、漢), 221 BCE–220 CE.


Tailbone (i.e., coccyx). Called Chángqiáng (Gv-1, 長強) (Long Strength) in acupuncture.


Protective Qì or Guardian Qì. The Qì at the surface of the body that generates a shield to protect the body from negative external influences such as colds.


Questions and answers.


Scholar fire. Means to build up the Qì at the Lower Dāntián gradually through soft and slender breathing.


A famous tàijíquán master during the Qīng Dynasty (AD 1644–1911) (清朝).


A well-known tàijíquán master at the beginning of the last century.


A Chinese Qìgōng master who lived during the late Míng (c) and early Qīng dynasties (清朝).


A famous tàijíquán master during the Qīng Dynasty (AD 1644–1911) (清朝).


Five strategic steppings in tàijíquán.


No extremity. This means no polarity, nothingness, or a tiny single point in space.


Five gates breathing. One of the grand circulation qìgōng practices of Chinese martial arts.


Five phases or five elements (i.e., metal, wood, water, fire, and earth).


Martial scholarship.


Applications of martial scholarship.


Name of a mountain located in China’s Húběi Province (湖北省).


Wǔdāng Mountain. Located in Húběi province (湖北省).


Martial fire. Means to build up the Qì at the Lower Dāntián quickly through fast abdominal breathing.


Wújí standing meditation.


Means “The thought of no thought.” The final stage of regulating the mind.


Five Qì(s) toward origins. A goal of Qìgōng wherein the Qì of the five Yīn organs (Heart, Lungs, Liver, Kidneys, and Spleen) is kept at the right (original) level. This will keep the organs from being either too Yáng or too Yīn, and will slow the degeneration process.


The Five Animal Sports. A popular medical Qìgōng that imitates the movements of the tiger, deer, bear, ape, and bird for health maintenance. It was created by Jūn Qiàn (君倩) during the Jìn Dynasty (265–420 CE, 晉朝), though others say it was created by Dr. Huá Tuó (華佗).


Literally, “Martial techniques.” A common name for the Chinese martial arts. Many other terms are used, including: Wǔyì (martial arts, 武藝), Wǔgōng (martial Gōngfū, 武功), Guóshù (national techniques, 國術), and Gōngfū (energy-time, 功夫). Because Wǔshù has been modified in mainland China over the past forty years into gymnastic martial performance, many traditional Chinese martial artist have given up this name in order to avoid confusing modern Wǔshù with traditional Wǔshù. Recently, mainland China has attempted to return modern Wǔshù to its traditional training and practice.


Five regulatings, including regulating the body, breathing, emotional mind, Qì, and spirit.


Regulating without regulating. All actions are so natural that no more regulating is necessary.


Means “the regulating without regulating.”


Five centers. The face, the Láogōng (勞宮) cavities on both palms, and the Yǒngquán (湧泉) cavities on the bottoms of both feet.


Five Elements or Five Phases; includes Metal (Jīn, 金), Wood (Mù, 木), Water (Shuǐ, 水), Fire (Huǒ, 火), and Earth (Tǔ, 土).


Five Gates Breathing. A Nèidān Qìgōng (內丹氣功) practice in which one uses the mind in coordination with breathing to lead Qì to the center of the palms, feet, and Bǎihuì (Gv-20, 百會).


Martial Grand Circulation—Power and Endurance.


Martial Qìgōng.

X


Happiness and delight.


“To wash” or “to clean.”


Slender.


Lower Dāntián. Located in the lower abdomen, it is believed to be the residence of Water Qì (Original Qì; Yuánqì, 元氣).


Downward neutralization.


Lower Burner. The lower abdomen is called “the Lower Burner.”


An immortal. A person who has attained enlightenment or Buddhahood, whose spirit can separate from and returned to his physical body at will.


Holy Embryo.


Pre-Birth Qì or Pre-Heaven Qì. Also called “Dāntiánqì” (丹田氣). The Qì that is converted from Original Essence (Yuánjīng, 元精) and is stored in the Lower Dāntián (下丹田). Considered to be Water Qì (Shuǐqì, 水氣). It is able to calm the body.


Small.


Filial Piety.


Small rollback.


Small circle.


Small Cyclic Heaven or Small Circulation Meditation. Called Microcosmic Orbit in Yoga, or Turning the Wheel of the Natural Law (Zhuǎn Fǎlún, 轉法輪) by Buddhist society. It is a Nèidān Qìgōng (內丹氣功) training in which Qì is generated at the Lower Dāntián (下丹田) and then moved through the Conception and Governing Vessels.


Lower section of the body from hips or knees down to the feet.


Training the lower section of the body.


Low Yīn. The groin. Also called Lóngmén (M-CA-24, 龍門) ( Dragon’s Gate) in Chinese medicine.


Releasing.


Diagonal flying. A form of tàijíquán posture.


Releasing Qì.


Evil Qì.


Washing the face.


Trust.


Heart. The mind generated from emotional disturbance; considered to be the fire mind.


Pericardium primary qì channel.


Human Nature.


Sexual Dual Cultivation (i.e., sexual Qì exchange).


Human nature life dual cultivation. Originally a Buddhist, though now predominantly Daoist approach to Qìgōng emphasizing the cultivation of both spirituality (human nature) and the physical body.


Sexual energy.


Literally, “Shape-mind Fist.” An internal style of Gōngfū in which the mind or thinking determines the shape or movement of the body. Creation of the style is attributed to Marshal Yuè, Fēi (岳飛).


Heart pit. A cavity for martial arts striking. It is called jiūwěi (Co-15) (鳩尾) in acupuncture.


Emotional mind-thought. The thought generated from the emotional mind.


Literally, “Heart-spirit.” This refers to the emotional mind that affects or is affected by Shén.


Means “The (emotional) mind and spirit are not peaceful.” A scattered mind.


Heart (mind) and breathing (are) mutually dependent.


Literally, “Heart (Xīn, 心) or emotional mind—Yì (wisdom mind).” This denotes the mind generated from both emotion and thought.


Xīn (is) an ape, and Yì (is) a horse. Xīn (heart) represents the emotional mind, which acts like a monkey, unsteady and disturbing. Yì is the wisdom mind generated from calm, clear thinking and judgment. The Yì is like a horse, calm and powerful.


Birthplace of Dr. Yáng, Jwìng-Mǐng in Táiwān (台灣).


Literally, “Washing Marrow/Brain Classic,” usually translated Marrow/Brain Washing Classic. A Qìgōng training that specializes in leading Qì to the marrow to cleanse it or to the brain to nourish the spirit for enlightenment. It is believed that Xǐsuǐjīng training is the key to longevity and spiritual enlightenment.


Marrow/Brain Washing Small Circulation. It can also be called Two Poles Small Circulation (Liǎngyí Xiǎozhōutiān, 兩儀小周天).


Cultivation, study, and training.


Cultivate the Qì. Cultivate implies to protect, maintain and refine. A Buddhist Qìgōng training.


Cultivating the body.


Means “Cultivate the body and await destiny.”


Tie to the Origin and Stop Method. One of the methods used to regulate the mind.


Tricky gate. Key places in Qìgōng training. The Third Eye is considered one of the “Xuánguān.”


Tricky stance. It means false stance (xūbù, 虛步).


Profound female animal. The marvelous and mysterious Dào, mother of creation of millions of objects.


False stance or insubstantial stance.


Literally, “Wave or hole.” An acupuncture cavity.


Cavity breathing.


Insubstantial energy leads the Jìng upward.


Train.


Insubstantial and substantial.


Means “Nothing.”

Y


Speaking or negotiating.


Itching.


One of the two poles (Liǎngyí, 兩儀). The other is Yīn. In Chinese philosophy, the active, positive, masculine polarity is classified as Yáng. In Chinese medicine, Yáng means excessive, overactive, or overheated. The Yáng (or outer) organs are the Gall Bladder, Small Intestine, Large Intestine, Stomach, Bladder, and Triple Burner.


To nourish, increase, raise up, or to cultivate.


A famous tàijíquán master during the Qīng Dynasty (AD 1644–1911) (清朝) He is also called Yáng, Yù (楊鈺).


A famous tàijíquán master during the period at the end of the Qīng Dynasty (AD 1644–1911) (清朝) and the beginning of The Republic of China (中華民國).


A martial arts teacher, scholar, and author (1946—).


A famous tàijíquán master during the Qīng Dynasty (AD 1644–1911) (清朝). He is also called Yáng, Bān-Hóu (楊班侯).


Literally, “The eyes are high and the hands are low.” That means expectations are higher than accomplishments.


Yǎng World. The material world in which we live.


Yáng Brightness. A special terminology used in acupuncture.


Means “To cultivate the Qì.”.


Yáng Heel Vessel. One of the eight Qì vessels.


Yáng fountain.


Yáng symbol circle.


Yáng spirit. Spirit that is raised up by emotional stimulation.


Yáng means “To raise, nourish, and maintain.” Shén means “Spirit.” Yǎngshén is the main Buddhist approach to regulating the Shén.


Brief Introduction to Nourishing the Body. A book written by Chén, Jì-Rú (陳繼儒) during the Qīng dynasty (清朝).


Life Nourishing Secrets. A medical book written by Zhāng, Ān-Dào (張安道) during the Sòng, Jīn, and Yuán dynasties (宋、金、元), 960–1368 CE.


Yáng Linking Vessel. One of the eight vessels.


Records of Cultivating Temperament and Extending Life. A Chinese medical book written by Táo, Hóng-Jǐng (陶弘景) in the period of 420 to 581 CE.


King of Hell. Title of the King in Hell.


Mind. Specifically, the mind generated by clear thinking and judgment, which can make you calm, peaceful, and wise. It is considered the water mind or wisdom mind.


To change, to replace, or to alter.


Ripple.


Justice or righteousness.


Common errors.


The Total Introduction to Medical Prescriptions. A Chinese medical book written by Wāng, Áng (汪昂) in the Qīng dynasty (清朝).


The Book of Changes. A book of divination written during the Zhōu dynasty (周朝) (1122–255 BCE). Considered the preeminent ancient Chinese classic (Qúnjīng Zhīshǒu, 群經之首) in Chinese history and has influenced Chinese culture heavily.


Literally, “Changing muscle/tendon classic,” usually called the Muscle/Tendon Changing Classic. Credited to Dámó (達摩) around 550 CE, this work discusses Wàidān Qìgōng training for strengthening the physical body.


Yìjīnjīng Small Circulation.


Lead.


In Chinese philosophy, the passive, negative, feminine polarity. In Chinese medicine, Yīn means deficient. The Yīn (internal) organs are the Heart, Lungs, Liver, Kidneys, Spleen, and Pericardium.


Yīn-yáng neutralization.


Yin symbol circle.


Two opposite positions of conditions or matters. Usually, yīn is translated as deficient and yang is translated as excess in Chinese medicine.


Yīn-yáng circle.


Yīn-yáng circling.


Hard gōngfū. Any Chinese martial training which emphasizes physical strength and power.


Managing Qì. The Qì that manages the functioning of the organs and the body.


Hard Qìgōng.


Welcome Fragrance. An acupuncture cavity that belongs to the Large Intestine channel.


Literally, “Wisdom mind-thought.” That means the thought generated from wise clear thinking.


Yīn world. The spirit world after death is considered Yīn.


Yīn junction. The junction of two vessels, the Conception Vessel (Rènmài, 任脈) and the Thrusting Vessel (Chōngmài, 衝脈). Yīnjiāo is on the Conception Vessel. It is also considered a paired cavity with Mìngmén (Gv-4) (命門) (Life’s Door), located between the L2 and L3 vertebrae.


Lead the Qì to its origin.


Yīn Heel Vessel. One of the eight vessels.


Concealed Yīn spirit. The spirit is nourished and raised by Water Qì; it is firm and steady.


Yīn water.


Seal Hall. A miscellaneous acupuncture cavity, located at the Third Eye area.


Yīn Linking Vessel. One of the eight vessels.


An archeological site of the late Shāng dynasty (商朝) burial ground.


Means “To nourish the Shén (spirit) with Qì.”


Harmonization of mind and Qì.


Use the Shén (spirit) to govern the Qì. A Qìgōng technique. Since the Shén is the headquarters for the Qì, it is the most effective way to control it.


Literally, “Yì recognize.” To use the Yì (wisdom mind) to sense and understand a situation. In order to do this, your Yì must search for information, evaluate it, and then reach a final decision. Yìshì is similar to “sense” in English; however, Yìshì is more active and aggressive.


Keep your Yì on your Lower Dāntián. In Qìgōng training, you keep your mind at the Lower Dāntián in order to build up Qì. When you are circulating your Qì, you always lead your Qì back to your Lower Dāntián before you stop your practice.


Means “Modulate the Xīn (emotional mind) to match the Yì (wisdom mind).”


Means “Use your Yì to meet the body.”


Use your Yì (wisdom mind) to lead your Qì. A Qìgōng technique. Qì cannot be pushed, but it can be led. This is best done with the Yì.


Will. Yì is commonly used together with will.


Gushing Spring. An acupuncture cavity on the Kidney Primary Qì Channel.


Yǒngquán qì breathing.


Long, far, meditative, continuous, slow, and soft.


Desire.


A Chinese dynasty from 1206–1367 CE.


Original Essence. The fundamental, original essential substance inherited from your parents. It is converted into Original Qì (Yuánqì, 元氣). Actually, the hormones produced by our endocrine glands are referred to as “Pre-Birth Essence” or “Original Essence.”


LoPre-Birth Qì or Original Qì. Inherited from your parents. It is also called “Xiāntiān Qì” (先天氣). which literally means “Pre-Heaven Qì.”


Original key point. Key points to the training.


Original Shén. The Shén that is kept in its residence by the Yì and that is nourished by the Original Qì.


The Primal Celestial Excellency. A Daoist deity.


Train with partners.


A Chinese hero from the Southern Sòng dynasty (南宋), 1127–1279 CE. He is said to have created Bāduànjǐn (八段錦), Xíngyìquán (形意拳 and Yuè’s Yīngzhǎo (岳家鷹爪).


The Supreme Deity. A Daoist title of the heaven emperor who rules heaven and earth.


Uniform or even.


Fair Lady Weaves with Shuttle. A posture of tàijíquán.

Z


To plant or to grow.


Plant and Graft Division. A style of Daoist Qìgōng training.


Viscera. The six Yīn organs. Five of these are considered the core of the entire human system—the Liver, Heart, Spleen, Lungs, and Kidneys. Usually, when a discussion involves the channels and all the organs, the Pericardium is added; otherwise it is treated as an adjunct of the Heart.


To boost the strength of immune system.


Build a firm root.


Intercept or attach.


A well-known Chinese physician and Qìgōng master who wrote the book, Yǎngshēngjué (Life Nourishing Secrets, 養生訣), during the Sòng, Jīn, and Yuán dynasties (宋、金、元), 960–1368 CE.


A Daoist who combined scholarly Daoism with Buddhist philosophies and created Religious Daoism (Dàojiào, 道教) during the Chinese Eastern Hàn dynasty (東漢), 25–221 CE.


Credited as the creator of tàijíquán during the Southern Sòng Dynasty (AD 1127–1279) (南宋).


A well-known Chinese physician who wrote the book Jīnguì Yàolüè (Prescriptions from the Golden Chamber, 金匱要略) during the Qín and Hàn dynasties (秦、漢), 221 BCE–220 CE.


A well-known Chinese physician who wrote the book Rúmén Shìshì (The Confucian Point of View, 儒門視事), during the Sòng, Jīn, and Yuán dynasties (宋、金、元), 960–1368 CE.


Adhering to the ball.


Trained on posts. It means standing meditation qìgōng practice.


Real dān tián. Located at the center of gravity (i.e., physical center).


Real Lower Dāntián (i.e., Real Lower Elixir Field). Human biobattery.


Normal Abdominal Breathing. Commonly called Buddhist Breathing (Fójiā Hūxī, 佛家呼吸).


Normal Qì or righteous Qì. When one is righteous, he is said to have righteous Qì, which evil Qì cannot overcome.


Acupuncture cavity.


Real Person or Truthful Person. Daoists call themselves “truthful persons” since they must be truthful to reopen their Third Eye.


The real breathing. That means the breathing has been regulated to a deep and profound level.


Stop.


Stop and Look Method. One of the methods used to regulate the mind.


Means “To stop the old thought from coming back.”


Methods of Stopping Thought. One of the methods used to regulate the mind.


Restrain the Xīn and Stop Method. One of the methods used to regulate the mind.


Medium.


Loyalty.


Heavy.


Middle Dāntián. Located in the area of the solar plexus, it is the residence of fire Qì.


Central equilibrium. One of tàijíquán’s five strategic steppings.


The Centered Look. A Qìgōng method for regulating the mind.


Middle Burner. One of the Triple Burners.


Central door. The shoulder-width space between two individuals facing each other.


Medium circle.


Refers to central earth, or central equilibrium.


Elbow.


To be complete, perfect, or round.


A dynasty in China from 1122–934 BCE.


Elbow neutralization.


Elbow smearing neutralization.


Elbow following neutralization.


Martial arts grand circulation.


A Comparative Study of the Zhōu (Dynasty) Book of Changes. A medical and Qìgōng book written by Wèi, Bó-Yáng (魏伯陽) during the Qín and Hàn dynasties (秦、漢), 221 BCE–220 CE.


A well-known Chinese physician who wrote the book Gézhì Yúlùn (A Further Thesis of Complete Study, 格致餘論), during the Sòng, Jīn, and Yuán dynasties (宋、金、元), 960–1368 CE.


Circling.


Also known as Zhuāngzi (莊子). A Daoist scholar who lived during the Warring States Period (403–222 BCE). He wrote a book also called Zhuāngzi (莊子).


The book written by the Daoist scholar Zhuāng Zhōu during the Chinese Warring States Period (403–222 BCE) (Zhànguó, 戰國).


Means “Concentrate on Qì and achieve softness.” A famous sentence line from Lǎozi’s Dào Dé Jīng (道德經).


Thesis on the Origins and Symptoms of Various Diseases. A Chinese medical book written by Cháo, Yuán-Fāng (巢元方) during the Suí and Táng dynasties (隋、唐), 581–907 CE.


Build a foundation.


Wrap coiling on the table.


Self-practice.


Free. It means freestyle in Tai Chi Push Hands book by Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming.


Self-awareness.


Self-recognition.


Zǐ (子) refers to the period around midnight (11 p.m. to 1 am), and Wǔ (午) refers to midday (11 am to 1 pm). Liúzhù (流注) means the tendency to flow. The term refers to a schedule of Qì circulation showing which channel has the predominant Qì flow at any particular time, and where the predominant Qì flow is in the Conception and Governing Vessels.


Self-awakening.


Walking.


Walk into the fire and enter into the devil. In Qìgōng training, if you have led your Qì into the wrong path it is called “walking into the fire” (Zǒuhuǒ, 走火), and if your mind has been led into a confused state, it is called “entering into the devil” (Rùmó, 入魔).